Selected Schueth_Rice_Families and Individuals

Notes


Norman Beach Conger

Maxine Crowell Leonard's CONGER FAMILY OF AMERICA I: pg: 400 & 460


Eliza Rathbone Lotspeich

Maxine Crowell Leonard's CONGER FAMILY OF AMERICA I: pg: 400


Bruce Prosper Conger

Maxine Crowell Leonard's CONGER FAMILY OF AMERICA I: pg: 400


Leslie Norman Conger

Maxine Crowell Leonard's CONGER FAMILY OF AMERICA I: pg: 400


Dorothy Kittie Conger

Maxine Crowell Leonard's CONGER FAMILY OF AMERICA I: pg: 400


Latham Hubbard Conger

Maxine Crowell Leonard's CONGER FAMILY OF AMERICA I: pg: 262 and 352
spouse shown as Jane Todd Watson
founded the Overland-Akron Company 1924
**********
From WFT Family Archives (CD #450)
County and Family Histories: Ohio, 1780-1970
Summit Co, Biographical Sketches pg 696


Jane Todd Watson

Maxine Crowell Leonard's CONGER FAMILY OF AMERICA II: pg 701


Leonard S Conger

Maxine Crowell Leonard's CONGER FAMILY OF AMERICA II: pg: 130-131
Pony Express rider from Salt Lake City to San Bernadino, CA.
lived in California at time of his father's will on 5 May 1858.
***********
Our Pioneer Heritage
Volume 4
The Mormons in San Bernardino
Mail
A Tribute
"Sheldon Stoddard, one of the early colonists in San Bernardino, is credited with having made twenty-four trips between these points and return. In August, 1854 the clerk recorded that "mail arrived from Great Salt Lake bringing news that Elders William Hyde and Conger (Leonard S.) were attacked at Resting Springs by Indians. Two men were wounded and the company lost one mule and part of the mail."
*******************
Heart Throbs of the West Volume 12
The Western Cowboy
Trailing Cattle On the Old Spanish or Mormon Trail in 1868 and Cache County
"During the summer of 1867 there was a drought. A disease among the cattle of southern California killed off a great many of the cattle in that section.
In the winter of 1867 and 1868 some merchants of Los Angeles sent three six-mule teams loaded with merchandise through to St. George, Utah, in charge of two men by the name of Tibbets and Virdick to trade this merchandise for cattle in southern Utah. The trade was made being an agreeable one both ways as the pioneers of southern Utah were in sore need of the merchandise and Tibbits and Virdick wanted the cattle. The merchandise was exchanged for 400 head of range cattle which were rounded up and turned over to these merchants. The following men of St. George were hired to trail these cattle through to Los Angeles: Len Conger, Thomas Judd, Frank Foster, Frank Palmer, Elijah Potter, Moroni Hicks, Frank Hubbard, and W. A. Perkins. Leonard Conger was appointed foreman of the herd as he had ridden the Pony Express over this old trail from Salt Lake City to San Bernardino in the early fifties and knew where all the water holes were and where the best grass was along this old trail.
Conger had many thrilling experiences along this old trail in the Fifties while riding the Pony Express. One incident as told by Conger was that at one time on coming through from San Bernardino with the Pony Express he met a party of emigrants at Las Vegas, Nevada. This was during the gold rush and this emigrant train was headed for the gold fields of California. They had had some trouble with the Indians of the Muddy Valley, (now called the Moapa
Valley.) A woman of this emigrant train had been killed by the Indians at the old California Crossing of the Muddy River. They had buried this woman and came on, and meeting Conger at Las Vegas, told him of this trouble. Conger went on with the Pony Express and on getting to the crossing of the Muddy, he found the Indians had disinterred this woman's body and had propped it up against a mesquite tree. He reburied her and went on and several days later on the return trip, on getting to this crossing, he found the Indians had dug up the body again and had propped it up against this mesquite tree. He related that three times did he bury this unfortunate woman before she was allowed to rest in peace. Conger was well fitted from previous experiences on this old trail to oversee and take charge of the trailing of this herd of cattle through to Los Angeles.
They started this herd on the trail from St. George on April 28th, 1868, coming up the Santa Clara Creek to the Indian Farm, twelve or fifteen miles being an average day`s drive. The cattle had to be night-herded after the day's drive. The men took turns at night herding as they had to have the cattle ready to start on the trail by daylight the next morning and as they were working shorthanded, the riders were kept in the saddle about eighteen hours out of twenty-four. They were furnished four yoke of oxen to pull the mess wagons and camp outfit with a camp cook who had charge and looked after the camp equipment. From the Indian Farm the trail led over the Beaver Dam
summit dropping on to the Virgin River at the Beaver Dams. It then followed down the Virgin River to a point about three miles below the present town of Bunkerville. This was many years before the towns of Bunkerville and
Mesquite were established.
They crossed Mormon Mesa near where the present highway 91 now runs, dropping into the Muddy Valley near Glendale Service Station. Uncle Billy stated there were hundreds of Indians in the Muddy Valley at this date and
while they had no trouble with these Indians they had to watch their camp equipment, supplies, and cattle very closely as these Indians would steal anything and everything they could lay hands on. From Glendale Service the
old trail followed up the Muddy River a distance of three miles to the Old California Crossing where the trail left the Muddy River starting across the desert for Las Vegas Rancho--a distance of fifty miles without water.
They left the old California Crossing on the Muddy in the evening in order that they might get as far out on this desert stretch as possible before the heat of the coming day. Saddle horses were allowed but one bucket of water
per day while crossing these desert stretches, as they were not equipped to haul any great amount of water. They drove two days and nights continuously with the exception of letting the cattle rest and graze for short intervals
before getting to the Las Vegas Rancho, (the city of Las Vegas.)
There were only two men living at Las Vegas at this time: Bill Knap and Octavious D. Gass, who was quite a prominent character in the early history of southern Nevada. There was a time in the history of this section when
what is now Clark Co, Nevada was called "Pahute" Co, Arizona Territory, with the county seat first established at Old Fort Callville on the Colorado River and later moved to St. Thomas, Nevada (Both buried
forever by storage waters from the Boulder Dam.) Gass was a member of the Arizona Territorial Legislature from Pahute County and served as such when this body met at Prescott, Arizona, and also at Tuscon, Arizona.
He was very hospitable, and tried to make things as pleasant as possible for the men of this trail drive when they arrived at the Las Vegas Rancho where they rested for a day. They then started the cattle out on the old trail
which bears southwest going by Cottonwood Springs and thence on to Mountain Springs. At this point they were caught in a desert thunderstorm or cloudburst and had considerable trouble holding the cattle.
The storm started, as the most of these desert storms do, with a heavy gale from the southwest, bursting in all its fury about 10 o`clock at night with peal after peal of deafening thunder claps. Blinding flashes of lightning lighted up the surrounding desert for miles at brief intervals. The rain poured down in sheets, with wind whipping and lashing it first one direction and then another. The cattle surged, bawled and milled from side to side trying to drift with the storm. Riders, wet to the skin, their clothes drenched and sodden, rode 'round and `round the herd trying to hold them together. They were tired and weary from long hours in the saddle but the cattle must be held for if allowed to scatter, days would be spent trying to get them together again. The storm finally passed on and when morning came and they could make a count, they were eight head short.
They had dropped out of the herd during the storm. Conger and Uncle Billy started back on their trail, followed them back for twenty-five miles and overtook six of the eight head. Two were never found. They were gone three
days before overtaking the herd again.
At Kingston Springs they were surrounded by a marauding band of Indians hostile and very saucy, outnumbering the white men at least five to one. They threatened to stampede the herd; started circling around yelling,
gesticulating, and all talking at once. They finally quieted down, talking among themselves. It looked as if they might be holding a council, debating the best method of disposing of the whites. First one Indian would make a
heated speech and then another. The situation looked very serious for the white men as they were not prepared to make a stand against the Indians--taken by surprise as they were. Conger cautioned the men to keep cool and quiet and not to get excited but to let him do the talking as he had been confronted with situations of this kind before. He finally persuaded the Indians to listen to him and he began talking to them of his dealings with the Indians and of his long Experience on the "Old Trail" and how he had always dealt fairly and honestly with them. He told them the cattle were not his but that they were just hired to drive them through for a "hiko" (white man) in Los Angeles and that he had been put in charge of the herd on account of his knowing the old trail and his fair dealings with
the Indians many years before, while Po-ken-de-avits (Pony Express Rider) for the Government. The spokesman or leader of the Indians who could understand and talk some English relayed the words back to his followers in
the Indian language. After listening very attentively to Conger for some time the spokesman for the Indians started talking: saying, "The country belongs to the Indians and not to the hikos. The mountain sheep, the rabbits, and quail and all native game belonged to the Indians." and after talking for some time, ended up by saying: "It's Injun`s water, and Injun's grass, White man`s cattle eat 'em all up."
Conger finally told the Indian that if they would allow them to move the herd on peaceably, he would kill three beeves for them. The Indian leader, after holding a pow-wow and talking it over with his followers, agreed to this. So three of the fattest cows were cut out of the herd and killed; after which they were allowed to start the herd on the trail again, thankful for getting out of a predicament where they stood little or no chance of an equal break, outnumbered as they were.
Their next water after leaving here was a bitter spring near the sinks of the Mojave River where they lost three more head of cattle. Two of the men were sent after them but after being gone two days, came back without
finding them. The Indians had probably run on to them and butchered them also.
When they got to the Mojave River proper near where Barstow now stands they held the cattle for several days, as they had been on the trail continuously since leaving St. George. Their saddle horses were jaded and leg-weary. Men were worn out from loss of sleep and long hours in the saddle. After several days of much needed rest, the herd was started on, following up the Mojave River over Cajon Pass and into San Bernardino (which Uncle Billy stated was a much larger town than Los Angeles as there were but a few adobe stores, gambling house and homes in Los Angeles at this time).
The cattle were trailed to within twenty miles of Los Angeles to a spring known at that time as Mud Springs where they were to be ranged.
They had left St. George, Utah, April 28th, 1868. They arrived at their destination near Los Angeles June 5, 1868. After staying with the cattle the better part of June getting them settled on their new range they startedback for St. George. The desert at this time of year was an inferno by day and little better at night. By leaving San Bernardino June 29 and riding day and night they got in to St. George July 3, 1868. Uncle Billy stated: "We were anxious and determined to get home for the Fourth of July celebration."
As the writer had been over this link of the old trail many times in the past few years and well knew the distance, he questioned this statement in regards to this ride, as it was an almost impossibility to ride it in five days. When I asked Uncle Billy if he was not mistaken as to the time it took to make this ride he answered very emphatically, "Hell no, we done it and done it easy."
Who can dispute them? They had driven 400 head of cattle over naked mountains, across barren desert wastes, through hostile Indian country for a distance of over 400 miles with a loss of only eight head. And three of this
number accounted for, being killed for the Indians at Kingston Springs. They accomplished this feat short-handed, under adverse conditions which hasn't a parallel in the history of the Southwest. It took men of this type who did
the almost impossible; but to use the words of Uncle Billy, "Done things and done them easy," whose unrecorded history if written would read stranger than fiction. And 'twas this type of men who were the forerunners to lay the
foundation for the conquering and subduing of the desert wastes of the Great Southwest.--George E. Perkins
In the spring of 1855 a group of stockmen, in Salt Lake City, organized, together with a representative of the L. D. S. Church, for the purpose of transferring cattle to the northern part of the State, since feed was becoming scarce in the Salt Lake Valley, and was reported plentiful in what was then called "Willow Valley," and which we now know as Cache Valley. A group of men were selected and hired to drive some twenty-five hundred or three thousand head of cattle--Bryant String-ham was made Captain, with Simon Baker and Andrew Moffatt as Lieutenants. Brigham Young Jr., and Joseph Baker were privates and Thomas Clayton was the cook. George Twist, Thomas Kendall, William Naylor and Samuel Roskelley were hired help. Stephen Taylor came along with cattle belonging to Daniel H. Wells, and Joseph Young sent his cattle in care of his son, Seymour B. Young. The majority of the cattle
belonged to the Church.
On July 22, 1855, the first group of men and cattle entered the Valley. For three days they camped near Haw Bush Springs just south of where Wellsville now stands, while a scouting party was sent out to locate a suitable camp site. They selected a fine spot near some large springs, midway between the towns of College Ward and Nibley, which of course were settled in later years.
On August 1, 1855, this group was joined by the Garr Brothers, John T., William H., Abel W., and Benjamin F. Lloyd, and Barnes, Vince Shurtliff, Miles and Franklin Weaver, Heber P. Kimball, Martin Luther Ensign, John C.
Dowdle, and possibly others, with additional cattle. Martin Luther Ensign and John C. Dowdle were good carpenters, and had been sent along to build houses and corrals at the campsite. Lumber was obtained from the many cottonwood trees which lined the river, about a mile to the east, adequate buildings were erected, part of the property was fenced. A large elk head was fastened above the gate to the main corral and the camp was christened,
"The Elk Horn Ranch."
In November, William Warner and Thomas Stolworthy and their wives, came to assist in taking care of the cattle and the herders. These young people had just arrived from England, having joined the Church and made the long trip in a sailing vessel--in fact, William Warner and his bride were married on the boat as they journeyed to Zion.
Heart Throbs of the West Heart Throbs of the West Volume 12 The Western Cowboy Cache County Winter set in early and was very severe. Because they reached the valley so late in the season they were able to stack only about 200 tons of hay to feed so many cattle. When the men realized that there was not enough feed to see them through the winter, they started to drive the cattle over the mountain into Weber and Box Elder Valleys where the winter was not so cold and the snow not so deep but what the cattle could get some feed by pawing the snow away and eating the grass and brush they found under it. However, the cattle were so poor and hungry that most of them perished and starved to death before they reached better feeding grounds. The snow was four and a half feet deep on the level, and these brave cowboys drove cattle, night and day, trying to keep the trail open. The men suffered terribly from exposure, cold and hunger. For years afterwards, a trail of the bleached bones of the cattle could be seen from the ranch to the mouth of the Weber River. Only about 450 cattle survived this severe winter."


Job Conger

Maxine Crowell Leonard's CONGER FAMILY OF AMERICA I: pg: 279 & 433 and revisions in
Maxine Crowell Leonard's CONGER FAMILY OF AMERICA II: pg: 130-131
Was a famer.
5 grandchildren were mentioned in his will.
Margaret H Boyd
Harriet J Crook
Levina E Martin
Maria A Preble, Indiana
Leonard H Conger of California & wife Betsy
also mentioned were
Uncle Benjamin Conger and Friend Moore.
Executors: Moore Conger (s/o Benjamin 1787) & son (of Job's) Levi Conger of Ira (NY).


Lucretia E Conger

Maxine Crowell Leonard's CONGER FAMILY OF AMERICA II: pg: 130-131


Calvin Conger

Maxine Crowell Leonard's CONGER FAMILY OF AMERICA I: pg: 48


Amanda P Horton

Maxine Crowell Leonard's CONGER FAMILY OF AMERICA I: pg: 48 and CFA II pg 714
Had been shown as Aranda Norton by Maxine but corrected to Amanda Horton on pg 714 of CFA II


David H Conger

Maxine Crowell Leonard's CONGER FAMILY OF AMERICA I: pg: 502
killed while in the military


Washington Perry Conger

Maxine Crowell Leonard's CONGER FAMILY OF AMERICA I: pg: 502
Served in Civil War with Co. H, 146th IL inf enlisting at Center, IL on 18 Sep 1864 with his brothers Benjamin Cortis and David H. David H was killed in the service 28 Nov 1867. Washington mustered out on 8 July 1865 after the war ended.
**********
From Kansas and Kansans: Volume 4:
"Aranda Conger, who was born in Peoria Co, Illinois, October 31, 1861.
When she was about nine years of age her parents, W. P. and Mary Hann Conger, who were natives respectively of Virginia and Illinois, moved from Peoria County to Marshalltown, Iowa, where the father still resides. He has always been a farmer, and is a veteran of the Union army during the Civil war. He is a republican and his wife a Methodist."


Mary Hands

Maxine Crowell Leonard's CONGER FAMILY OF AMERICA I: pg: 501
Also found as 'Mary Hann' and HAND and HANDS.


George Washington Conger

Maxine Crowell Leonard's CONGER FAMILY OF AMERICA I: pg: 502


Mary Ellen Conger

Maxine Crowell Leonard's CONGER FAMILY OF AMERICA I: pg: 502


Charlotte Conger

Maxine Crowell Leonard's CONGER FAMILY OF AMERICA I: pg: 502


Perry E Cook

Kansas and Kansans: Volume 4
"A resident of Kansas for thirty years, Perry E. Cook was born in Boone
Co, Indiana, December 12, 1859, a son of Oscar and Charity (Wiley) Cook.

of his father...
(His father, who was a native of Cayuga Co, New York, was a farmer. After
living for many years in Boone Co, Indiana, he moved to Appanoose County,
Iowa, in October, 1877, but after three years returned to Indiana and
established his home in Hendricks County where he lived until his death on
March 1, 1912. He was a republican, and a member of the Independent Order of
Odd Fellows. His wife, who was born in Russellville, Kentucky, died in
Indianapolis in August, 1915. She was a member of the Christian Church.)

Reared on a farm, Perry E. Cook acquired his knowledge of books and literary
learning through the district schools of Boone Co, Indiana, and the grade
schools of Royalton, Indiana. With an inclination for the handling of tools,
he early turned [p.1763] his attention to the trade of carpenter and followed
it as a master workman in various places in Iowa for seven years. In June,
1886, just thirty years ago, Mr. Cook arrived in Topeka, and worked at his
trade as a journeyman until October, 1889. He then entered the Santa Fe
Railway shops, where he remained about five years, and from that took up the
business of contracting, the business he has followed ever since. His offices
since 1906 has been at 110 West Sixth Avenue, and prior to that time they
were at 117 West Fifth Street.

Mr. Cook owns a substantial home at 911 Highland Avenue, where he has resided
for twelve years. He is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and
in politics an independent republican. He has a fine family, and some of his
sons are now associated with him in business."
***********************


Aranda Fidelia Conger

Maxine Crowell Leonard's CONGER FAMILY OF AMERICA I: pg: 502
born Marshalltown, Marshall Co, IA 30 Oct 1864
*********
From Kansas and Kansans: Volume 4:
"Mr. and Mrs. Cook's four children were all born in Topeka: Wilbur O., a carpenter and associated with his father; Blanche M., wife of R. A. Showers, a carpenter; Perry E., now deceased; and Herbert W., who is in the insurance
business."


Ira Charles Conger

Maxine Crowell Leonard's CONGER FAMILY OF AMERICA I: pg: 239 and 244
"He may of been a son of Isaac CONGER 1802, son of Joshua CONGER 1768. Several children of Isaac's brother John moved to Johnson county, Arkansas in the 1840's. Ira Charles moved to Arkansas in 1845, abt age 18; emmigrated to Yamhill co, Oregon in 1852 (abt age 25); moved to Cowlitz co Washington in 1868 and died there in 1908, age 81. Ira's 3rd, 4th and 5th children died in a two week period of scarlet fever."
Doug Schueths notes that the above order would of been relative to the surviving children as Thomas died young probably before the three died of scarlet fever.
Maxine Crowell Leonard's CONGER FAMILY OF AMERICA II: pg: 118
*************
The Role of Land Laws in the Settlement of Oregon
by Dorothy O. Johansen
No. 3296 CONGER, Ira C., Yamhill Co; b 1827, Tenn; Arr. Ore. Aug 1853; SC 7
Sept 1853; m Melissa 13 Apr 1848, Ark. Aff: David Layfield, Ranson Higgins,
Joseph Hess, John Brisbine.
******************
From: GENWEB Arkansas
COUNTY: Independence
DIVISION: WashingtonTownship
PAGE NO: 371
REFERENCE: 18th day of November 1850 Census
Found as Iral CONGER
***********
In the 1860 Oregon Census
CENSUS YR: 1860 STATE: Oregon COUNTY: Yamhill DIVISION: Chehalem Valley Precinct
LN HN FN LAST NAME FIRST NAME AGE SEX RACE OCCUP. REAL VAL. PERS VAL. BIRTHPLACE MRD. SCH. R/W DDB
26 4129 3523 Conger Ira 32 M Farmer 640 390 Tennessee
27 4129 3523 Conger Melissa 31 F Arkansas
28 4129 3523 Conger Margaret 11 F Arkansas X
29 4129 3523 Conger Martha 9 F Arkansas X
30 4129 3523 Conger Oriellen 3 F Oregon
31 4129 3523 Conger John 1 M Oregon


Melissa O'Neal

Maxine Crowell Leonard's CONGER FAMILY OF AMERICA II: pg: 118
shown as O'NEAL
***********
From: GENWEB Arkansas
COUNTY: Independence
DIVISION: WashingtonTownship
PAGE NO: 371
REFERENCE: 18th day of November 1850 Census
found as "Malissa"
****************


Martha J Conger

Maxine Crowell Leonard's CONGER FAMILY OF AMERICA I: pg: 239 and CFA II pg 118
*************


Oriellen Conger (Twin)

Maxine Crowell Leonard's CONGER FAMILY OF AMERICA I: pg: 239 and CFA II pg 118
" Ira's 3rd, 4th and 5th children died in a two week period of scarlet fever."
*************


Thomas Rita Conger (Twin)

Maxine Crowell Leonard's CONGER FAMILY OF AMERICA II: pg: 118
died young
not in the 1860 census
*************


John Medford Conger

Maxine Crowell Leonard's CONGER FAMILY OF AMERICA I: pg: 239 and CFA II pg 118
" Ira's 3rd, 4th and 5th children died in a two week period of scarlet fever."
*************


Charles Newton Conger (Twin)

Maxine Crowell Leonard's CONGER FAMILY OF AMERICA I: pg: 239 and CFA II pg 118
" Ira's 3rd, 4th and 5th children died in a two week period of scarlet fever."
*************


Melissa Conger

Maxine Crowell Leonard's CONGER FAMILY OF AMERICA II: pg: 118
shows birth abt 1869