Selected Schueth_Rice_Families and Individuals

Notes


Gov Thomas Welles

DWS: from History and Genealogy Unit, Connecticut State Library
http://www.cslib.org/gov/wellest.htm
"Born: ca. 1590 in Stourton, Whichford, Warwickshire, England
College: None
Political Party: None
Offices:Member, Court of Magistrates, 1637-1654
Deputy Governor of the Colony of Connecticut 1654, 1656, 1657, 1659
Treasurer of the Colony of Connecticut 1639
Secretary of the Colony of Connecticut 1640-1649
Commissioner of the United Colonies 1649
Governor of the Colony of Connecticut 1655, 1658
Died: January 14, 1659/60 at Wethersfield, CT
Thomas Welles is the only man in Connecticut's history to hold all four top offices: governor, deputy governor, treasurer, and secretary. He was born ca. 1590 in Stourton, Whichford, Warwickshire, England, the son of Robert and Alice Welles.
Thomas arrived in Boston prior to 9 June 1636, when his deed was witnessed, but was probably not the Thomas Welles who was a passenger on the Susan and Ellen in 1635 as reported in some sources (that Thomas was probably the Thomas Welles who became a resident of Ipswich, Massachusetts). Thomas is said to have been a secretary to Lord Saye and Sele. While no primary evidence for this has been found, the books in his estate suggest that he had a good education and he did have close associations with Saye and Sele, although he had little to do with the development of the Saybrook Colony. He perhaps lived at Newtown (now Cambridge), MA for a while, and was probably one of the group of about 100 to come to Hartford with Thomas Hooker in 1636.
Thomas Welles served a total of nineteen years in various Colony of Connecticut positions. He was a member of the first Court of Magistrates, elected March 28, 1637, and was reelected as a member of the Court of Magistrates from 1638 until 1654. During his terms as magistrate in 1648, 1651, and 1654 he sat on the panel hearing the witchcraft trials of Mary Johnson, John and Joan Carrington, and Lydia Gilbert. In 1639 he was elected as the first treasurer of the Colony of Connecticut, and from 1640-1649 served as the colony's secretary. In this capacity he transcribed the Fundamental Orders into the official colony records. On May 18, 1654 he was elected as Deputy Governor and became the acting moderator of the General Court, as the elected governor, Edward Hopkins, was in England. He was elected governor in 1655 and 1658 and served again as deputy governor for 1656, 1657, and 1659. He was a commissioner to the New England Confederation in 1649 and in 1654. For a more extensive summary of Thomas Welles' service to the Connecticut Colony, see Appendix B of Siemiatoski's genealogy, below.
Thomas Welles married Alice Tomes soon after July 5, 1615 in Long Marston, Gloucestershire, and the couple had eight children. After her death, he married again about 1646 in Wethersfield. His second wife was Elizabeth (nee Deming) Foote, sister of John Deming and widow of Nathaniel Foote. Elizabeth had seven children by her previous marriage; there were no children from the second marriage.
Thomas Welles lived in Hartford from 1636 until the time of his second marriage. His house was on the same street as Governors Edward Hopkins, George Wyllys, John Webster, and Thomas H. Seymour, a street that was known as Governor Street until more recent times, when the name was changed to Popieluszko Court. He died on January 14, 1660 at Wethersfield and was probably buried there. Some sources indicate that his remains were later transferred to the Ancient Burying Ground in Hartford. In either case, his grave is presently unmarked. His name appears on the Founders Monument in Hartford's Ancient Burying Ground.
Bibliography:
National Cyclopedia of American Biography. New York: J. T. White, 1898- , s.v. "Thomas Welles" [CSL call number HistRef E 176 .N27].

Norton, Frederick Calvin. The Governors of Connecticut. Hartford: Connecticut Magazine Co., 1905 [CSL call number HistRef F93 .N 88 1905].

Raimo, John W. Biographical Dictionary of American Colonial and Revolutionary Governors 1607-1789. Westport, CT: Meckler Books, 1980 [CSL call number E 187.5 .R34].

Siematowski, Donna Holt. The Descendants of Governor Thomas Welles of Connecticut, 1590-1658. 1990. Baltimore: Gateway Press, 1990 [CSL call number CS 71 .W55 1990].

Talcott, Mary Kingsley. The Original Proprietors. Reprint. [Hartford?]: Society of the Descendants of the Founders of Hartford, Inc., 1986 [CSL call number HistRef F 104 .H353 A26 1986].

Welles, Edmund. The Life and Public Services of Thomas Welles, Fourth Governor of Connecticut 1940.

Welles, Lemuel. "The English Ancestry of Gov. Thomas Welles of Connecticut," New England Historical and Genealogical Register 80 (1926), pp. 279-447 [CSL call number F 1 .N56]."
**********
DWS: A catalogue of the names of the first Puritan settlers of the colony of Connecticut :
Hartford: Printed by E. Gleason, 1846 by Royal Ralph Hinman: pg 93-94
"Welles, Gov. Thomas, came into the colony and located himself at Hartford in the autumn of 1636, and upon the 28th day of March, 1637. he became a member of the Court of Magistrates. In April following an important crisis had arrived. The inhabitants of the colony had been constantly annoyed by the Indians, and particularly by the Pequots, by robberies, murders, and the abduction of two respectable young ladies from Wethersfield, who had been carried among the Indians-which outrages could no longer be submitted to by the English settlers. To redress these grievances a General Court of Magistrates were convened, and the three towns which then formed the colony, were ordered, for the purpose of adding safety to the counsels of the court, to send a committee of three persons from each town, to set as advisers with the General Court. Gov. Welles was one of the Court of Magistrates held on the 7th day of May, 1637, who declared an offensive war against the powerful and warlike nation of Pequots, for the redress of the many grievances they had visited upon the English settlers. It was a most important meeting and decision not only to the colony, but to all the settlers in New England. The Indians had not only murdered many of the English, but had driven away their cattle, and committed other gross wrongs. After mature deliberation, war was declared, and the result saved the colony, and was of immense advantage to all the other colonies, and much credit was due to Mr. Welles for his course taken in this important step. After this time he appears to have become an important man in the colony. He was uniformly a member of the Court of Magistrates after March, 1637, until he was elected Deputy Governor, in 1654. In 1640 he was appointed secretary of the colony, which office he held until 1649, and performed the duty of both offices during the whole period. For a time he also performed the duties of treasurer for the colony in 1639. At the session of the General Court in 1653, in March and April, the Governor being absent, Mr. Welles performed the duties of the Governor as Moderator of the General Assembly under the Constitution of the Commonwealth. In 1654 he was elected Deputy Governor, in 1656, 7 and 1659. He was also elected Governor in 1655 and 8. In 1649 he was a Commissioner to the Colony Congress. Gov. Welles was frequently associated with Haynes, Ludlow, Mason and other leading men upon important committees appointed by the General Court. He did much in the formation and union of the colonies in 1643, for the mutual benefit and protection of each other. No one of the distinguished men of his time was more uniformly attentive to all his official duties than Gov. Welles, from his first appointment in 1637, until 1659. He was a constant attendant upon the General Court, except when employed in other public duties. His whole public life being fairly examined, he was as important a prop to the new colony as any of the principal men, except Gov. Winthrop.-He died in 1668, (DWS note: probably a typo - died in 1660) and left a large estate to his children, viz. Thomas, Ichabod, Samuel, Jonathan, Joseph, Rebecca and Sarah. Samuel settled at Wethersfield. The descendants of Gov. Welles are numerous in Connecticut at this time. The most prominent of whom are Hon. Gideon, of Hartford-since his late appointment, at Washington-Thaddeus, Esq., of Glastenbury-Hon. Martin, of Wethersfield. and Doct. H. Welles, of Hartford. Gov. Welles came to Massachusetts in a vessel named the (!!!wrong) Susan and Ellen, E. Pavne, master, in company with Richard Saltonstall, Esq. and family, Walter Thornton and others."
!!!(DWS note: was probably not the Thomas Welles who was a passenger on the Susan and Ellen in 1635 as reported in some sources (that Thomas was probably the Thomas Welles who became a resident of Ipswich, Massachusetts)... from History and Genealogy Unit, Connecticut State Library Jan 2004 http://www.cslib.org/gov/wellest.htm )
**********************
DWS: A Genealogical Dictionary Of The First Settlers Of New England By James Savage,
Former President Of The Massachusetts Historical Society Baltimore Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc. Originally Published Boston, 1860-1862:
"THOMAS, Hartford, an orig. propr. as also at Wethersfield, appears first in the Rec. of that Col. Trumbull I. 9, as the sec. magistr. at the Gen. Ct. 1 May 1637, when war was denounc. against the Pequots, they hav. long been hostile, and the proportion of 90 men fixed for the sev. planta. viz. Hartford, 42, Windsor, 30, and Wethersfield, 18. Yet it is quite uncert. when he came from Eng. tho. satisfactor. kn. that he brot. three s. John, Thomas, and Samuel, and three ds. Mary, wh. d. bef. her f. prob. unm. Ann, and Sarah; equal. uncert. is the name of his w. though we can hardly doubt whether he brot. one; and stranger still is the uncertainty of his prior resid. in Mass. He had good proportion of the patents for Swampscot and Dover, wh. he sold Aug. 1648, to Christopher Lawson. We may then safely conclude, that a person of his educ. and good est. had not come over the water bef. 1636, and that he staid so short a time at Boston or Cambridge as to leave no trace of hims. at either, and he was estab. at Hartford bef. Gov. Haynes left Cambridge. There is, indeed, a very precise tradit. of his coming, with f. Nathaniel, in the fleet with Higginson, 1629, to Salem; but that is merely ridiculous. He took, for sec. w. a. 1645, Eliz. wid. of Nathaniel Foote of Wethersfield; on the d. of Gov. Haynes, 1 Mar. 1654, the Dept. Edward Hopkins being in Eng. on pub. business, he was made head of the Col. with title of Moderator, but on the day of elect. in May, Hopkins was chos. Gov. and Welles Dept. tho. H. never came back to Conn. being tak. by the great Protector into his Parliam. so that in 1655, hav. had the duty to fulfil in the vacation of the chair, he was chos. Gov. and Webster, Dept. and in 1656, accord. to the constitut. of the Col. 'that no person be chos. Gov. above once in two yrs.' Webster was made Gov. and in 1657, Winthrop Gov. while Welles was Dept. both yrs. and in 1658 made Gov. again with Winth. for Dept. Both chang. places in May 1659, and Welles d. 14 Jan. foll. at Wethersfield. His wid. d. 28 July 1683; d. Ann m. 14 Apr. 1646, Thomas Thompson of Farmington, and next, Anthony Hawkins; and Sarah m. Feb. 1654, capt. John Chester, outliv. him less than ten yrs. and d. 16 Dec. 1698."
**********
DWS: The History of Ancient Wethersfield, Connecticut Vol 2 Genealogies and Biographies of Ancient Wethersfield 1904 by Sherman W Adams and edited by Henry R Stiles A.M., M.D.pg 760-761
"Mr. Thomas Welles, the Deputy-Gov., d. 14 Jan., 1659-60,--Weth. T. Rec. Gov. Winthrop, in a letter dated 3 Apl., 1660, mentions Gov. W's. dth. as having been very sudden. 'being very well at supper, and dead before midnight.' Mass. Hist. Soc. Coll. VIII, 5 Series. p. 58; he was bu. at Weth. but his remains were afterward rem. to Htfd. His will, dated 7 Nov., 1659, was approved and ordered on rec. 11 Apl., 1660. Mr. John Talcott. Sen., and Rev. John Cotton, "teacher at Weth.," being exec'rs, assisted (by the Ct's orders) by Wm. Wadsworth and Jo. Deming, Sen.-Conn. Col. Rec. I, 346. Inventory £1069-00-02. Prob. Ct. Rec., III, p. 136, included "books, Eng., and Latin."
Gov. Welles m. (1) in Eng.----; (2) about 1646 Elizabeth Deming, wid. of Nathaniel Foote, also a first settler of Weth.; and sister of John Deming, another first settler. She d. 28 July, 1633, ae. abt. 88 yrs.; had 7 children by her first husband (Foote) to whom she willed her ppy.
Children (all by first marr.):"


Mary Welles

DWS: A Genealogical Dictionary Of The First Settlers Of New England By James Savage,
Former President Of The Massachusetts Historical Society Baltimore Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc. Originally Published Boston, 1860-1862:


Ichabod Welles

DWS: A catalogue of the names of the first Puritan settlers of the colony of Connecticut :
Hartford: Printed by E. Gleason, 1846 by Royal Ralph Hinman: pg 93-95


Jonathan Welles

DWS: A catalogue of the names of the first Puritan settlers of the colony of Connecticut :
Hartford: Printed by E. Gleason, 1846 by Royal Ralph Hinman: pg 93-95


Joseph Welles

DWS: A catalogue of the names of the first Puritan settlers of the colony of Connecticut :
Hartford: Printed by E. Gleason, 1846 by Royal Ralph Hinman: pg 93-95


Rebecca Welles

DWS: A catalogue of the names of the first Puritan settlers of the colony of Connecticut :
Hartford: Printed by E. Gleason, 1846 by Royal Ralph Hinman: pg 93-95


Gov Thomas Welles

DWS: from History and Genealogy Unit, Connecticut State Library
http://www.cslib.org/gov/wellest.htm
"Born: ca. 1590 in Stourton, Whichford, Warwickshire, England
College: None
Political Party: None
Offices:Member, Court of Magistrates, 1637-1654
Deputy Governor of the Colony of Connecticut 1654, 1656, 1657, 1659
Treasurer of the Colony of Connecticut 1639
Secretary of the Colony of Connecticut 1640-1649
Commissioner of the United Colonies 1649
Governor of the Colony of Connecticut 1655, 1658
Died: January 14, 1659/60 at Wethersfield, CT
Thomas Welles is the only man in Connecticut's history to hold all four top offices: governor, deputy governor, treasurer, and secretary. He was born ca. 1590 in Stourton, Whichford, Warwickshire, England, the son of Robert and Alice Welles.
Thomas arrived in Boston prior to 9 June 1636, when his deed was witnessed, but was probably not the Thomas Welles who was a passenger on the Susan and Ellen in 1635 as reported in some sources (that Thomas was probably the Thomas Welles who became a resident of Ipswich, Massachusetts). Thomas is said to have been a secretary to Lord Saye and Sele. While no primary evidence for this has been found, the books in his estate suggest that he had a good education and he did have close associations with Saye and Sele, although he had little to do with the development of the Saybrook Colony. He perhaps lived at Newtown (now Cambridge), MA for a while, and was probably one of the group of about 100 to come to Hartford with Thomas Hooker in 1636.
Thomas Welles served a total of nineteen years in various Colony of Connecticut positions. He was a member of the first Court of Magistrates, elected March 28, 1637, and was reelected as a member of the Court of Magistrates from 1638 until 1654. During his terms as magistrate in 1648, 1651, and 1654 he sat on the panel hearing the witchcraft trials of Mary Johnson, John and Joan Carrington, and Lydia Gilbert. In 1639 he was elected as the first treasurer of the Colony of Connecticut, and from 1640-1649 served as the colony's secretary. In this capacity he transcribed the Fundamental Orders into the official colony records. On May 18, 1654 he was elected as Deputy Governor and became the acting moderator of the General Court, as the elected governor, Edward Hopkins, was in England. He was elected governor in 1655 and 1658 and served again as deputy governor for 1656, 1657, and 1659. He was a commissioner to the New England Confederation in 1649 and in 1654. For a more extensive summary of Thomas Welles' service to the Connecticut Colony, see Appendix B of Siemiatoski's genealogy, below.
Thomas Welles married Alice Tomes soon after July 5, 1615 in Long Marston, Gloucestershire, and the couple had eight children. After her death, he married again about 1646 in Wethersfield. His second wife was Elizabeth (nee Deming) Foote, sister of John Deming and widow of Nathaniel Foote. Elizabeth had seven children by her previous marriage; there were no children from the second marriage.
Thomas Welles lived in Hartford from 1636 until the time of his second marriage. His house was on the same street as Governors Edward Hopkins, George Wyllys, John Webster, and Thomas H. Seymour, a street that was known as Governor Street until more recent times, when the name was changed to Popieluszko Court. He died on January 14, 1660 at Wethersfield and was probably buried there. Some sources indicate that his remains were later transferred to the Ancient Burying Ground in Hartford. In either case, his grave is presently unmarked. His name appears on the Founders Monument in Hartford's Ancient Burying Ground.
Bibliography:
National Cyclopedia of American Biography. New York: J. T. White, 1898- , s.v. "Thomas Welles" [CSL call number HistRef E 176 .N27].

Norton, Frederick Calvin. The Governors of Connecticut. Hartford: Connecticut Magazine Co., 1905 [CSL call number HistRef F93 .N 88 1905].

Raimo, John W. Biographical Dictionary of American Colonial and Revolutionary Governors 1607-1789. Westport, CT: Meckler Books, 1980 [CSL call number E 187.5 .R34].

Siematowski, Donna Holt. The Descendants of Governor Thomas Welles of Connecticut, 1590-1658. 1990. Baltimore: Gateway Press, 1990 [CSL call number CS 71 .W55 1990].

Talcott, Mary Kingsley. The Original Proprietors. Reprint. [Hartford?]: Society of the Descendants of the Founders of Hartford, Inc., 1986 [CSL call number HistRef F 104 .H353 A26 1986].

Welles, Edmund. The Life and Public Services of Thomas Welles, Fourth Governor of Connecticut 1940.

Welles, Lemuel. "The English Ancestry of Gov. Thomas Welles of Connecticut," New England Historical and Genealogical Register 80 (1926), pp. 279-447 [CSL call number F 1 .N56]."
**********
DWS: A catalogue of the names of the first Puritan settlers of the colony of Connecticut :
Hartford: Printed by E. Gleason, 1846 by Royal Ralph Hinman: pg 93-94
"Welles, Gov. Thomas, came into the colony and located himself at Hartford in the autumn of 1636, and upon the 28th day of March, 1637. he became a member of the Court of Magistrates. In April following an important crisis had arrived. The inhabitants of the colony had been constantly annoyed by the Indians, and particularly by the Pequots, by robberies, murders, and the abduction of two respectable young ladies from Wethersfield, who had been carried among the Indians-which outrages could no longer be submitted to by the English settlers. To redress these grievances a General Court of Magistrates were convened, and the three towns which then formed the colony, were ordered, for the purpose of adding safety to the counsels of the court, to send a committee of three persons from each town, to set as advisers with the General Court. Gov. Welles was one of the Court of Magistrates held on the 7th day of May, 1637, who declared an offensive war against the powerful and warlike nation of Pequots, for the redress of the many grievances they had visited upon the English settlers. It was a most important meeting and decision not only to the colony, but to all the settlers in New England. The Indians had not only murdered many of the English, but had driven away their cattle, and committed other gross wrongs. After mature deliberation, war was declared, and the result saved the colony, and was of immense advantage to all the other colonies, and much credit was due to Mr. Welles for his course taken in this important step. After this time he appears to have become an important man in the colony. He was uniformly a member of the Court of Magistrates after March, 1637, until he was elected Deputy Governor, in 1654. In 1640 he was appointed secretary of the colony, which office he held until 1649, and performed the duty of both offices during the whole period. For a time he also performed the duties of treasurer for the colony in 1639. At the session of the General Court in 1653, in March and April, the Governor being absent, Mr. Welles performed the duties of the Governor as Moderator of the General Assembly under the Constitution of the Commonwealth. In 1654 he was elected Deputy Governor, in 1656, 7 and 1659. He was also elected Governor in 1655 and 8. In 1649 he was a Commissioner to the Colony Congress. Gov. Welles was frequently associated with Haynes, Ludlow, Mason and other leading men upon important committees appointed by the General Court. He did much in the formation and union of the colonies in 1643, for the mutual benefit and protection of each other. No one of the distinguished men of his time was more uniformly attentive to all his official duties than Gov. Welles, from his first appointment in 1637, until 1659. He was a constant attendant upon the General Court, except when employed in other public duties. His whole public life being fairly examined, he was as important a prop to the new colony as any of the principal men, except Gov. Winthrop.-He died in 1668, (DWS note: probably a typo - died in 1660) and left a large estate to his children, viz. Thomas, Ichabod, Samuel, Jonathan, Joseph, Rebecca and Sarah. Samuel settled at Wethersfield. The descendants of Gov. Welles are numerous in Connecticut at this time. The most prominent of whom are Hon. Gideon, of Hartford-since his late appointment, at Washington-Thaddeus, Esq., of Glastenbury-Hon. Martin, of Wethersfield. and Doct. H. Welles, of Hartford. Gov. Welles came to Massachusetts in a vessel named the (!!!wrong) Susan and Ellen, E. Pavne, master, in company with Richard Saltonstall, Esq. and family, Walter Thornton and others."
!!!(DWS note: was probably not the Thomas Welles who was a passenger on the Susan and Ellen in 1635 as reported in some sources (that Thomas was probably the Thomas Welles who became a resident of Ipswich, Massachusetts)... from History and Genealogy Unit, Connecticut State Library Jan 2004 http://www.cslib.org/gov/wellest.htm )
**********************
DWS: A Genealogical Dictionary Of The First Settlers Of New England By James Savage,
Former President Of The Massachusetts Historical Society Baltimore Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc. Originally Published Boston, 1860-1862:
"THOMAS, Hartford, an orig. propr. as also at Wethersfield, appears first in the Rec. of that Col. Trumbull I. 9, as the sec. magistr. at the Gen. Ct. 1 May 1637, when war was denounc. against the Pequots, they hav. long been hostile, and the proportion of 90 men fixed for the sev. planta. viz. Hartford, 42, Windsor, 30, and Wethersfield, 18. Yet it is quite uncert. when he came from Eng. tho. satisfactor. kn. that he brot. three s. John, Thomas, and Samuel, and three ds. Mary, wh. d. bef. her f. prob. unm. Ann, and Sarah; equal. uncert. is the name of his w. though we can hardly doubt whether he brot. one; and stranger still is the uncertainty of his prior resid. in Mass. He had good proportion of the patents for Swampscot and Dover, wh. he sold Aug. 1648, to Christopher Lawson. We may then safely conclude, that a person of his educ. and good est. had not come over the water bef. 1636, and that he staid so short a time at Boston or Cambridge as to leave no trace of hims. at either, and he was estab. at Hartford bef. Gov. Haynes left Cambridge. There is, indeed, a very precise tradit. of his coming, with f. Nathaniel, in the fleet with Higginson, 1629, to Salem; but that is merely ridiculous. He took, for sec. w. a. 1645, Eliz. wid. of Nathaniel Foote of Wethersfield; on the d. of Gov. Haynes, 1 Mar. 1654, the Dept. Edward Hopkins being in Eng. on pub. business, he was made head of the Col. with title of Moderator, but on the day of elect. in May, Hopkins was chos. Gov. and Welles Dept. tho. H. never came back to Conn. being tak. by the great Protector into his Parliam. so that in 1655, hav. had the duty to fulfil in the vacation of the chair, he was chos. Gov. and Webster, Dept. and in 1656, accord. to the constitut. of the Col. 'that no person be chos. Gov. above once in two yrs.' Webster was made Gov. and in 1657, Winthrop Gov. while Welles was Dept. both yrs. and in 1658 made Gov. again with Winth. for Dept. Both chang. places in May 1659, and Welles d. 14 Jan. foll. at Wethersfield. His wid. d. 28 July 1683; d. Ann m. 14 Apr. 1646, Thomas Thompson of Farmington, and next, Anthony Hawkins; and Sarah m. Feb. 1654, capt. John Chester, outliv. him less than ten yrs. and d. 16 Dec. 1698."
**********
DWS: The History of Ancient Wethersfield, Connecticut Vol 2 Genealogies and Biographies of Ancient Wethersfield 1904 by Sherman W Adams and edited by Henry R Stiles A.M., M.D.pg 760-761
"Mr. Thomas Welles, the Deputy-Gov., d. 14 Jan., 1659-60,--Weth. T. Rec. Gov. Winthrop, in a letter dated 3 Apl., 1660, mentions Gov. W's. dth. as having been very sudden. 'being very well at supper, and dead before midnight.' Mass. Hist. Soc. Coll. VIII, 5 Series. p. 58; he was bu. at Weth. but his remains were afterward rem. to Htfd. His will, dated 7 Nov., 1659, was approved and ordered on rec. 11 Apl., 1660. Mr. John Talcott. Sen., and Rev. John Cotton, "teacher at Weth.," being exec'rs, assisted (by the Ct's orders) by Wm. Wadsworth and Jo. Deming, Sen.-Conn. Col. Rec. I, 346. Inventory £1069-00-02. Prob. Ct. Rec., III, p. 136, included "books, Eng., and Latin."
Gov. Welles m. (1) in Eng.----; (2) about 1646 Elizabeth Deming, wid. of Nathaniel Foote, also a first settler of Weth.; and sister of John Deming, another first settler. She d. 28 July, 1633, ae. abt. 88 yrs.; had 7 children by her first husband (Foote) to whom she willed her ppy.
Children (all by first marr.):"


Elizabeth Deming

Descendants of John Webster, I (Governor) Submitted by Dorothy Ann Schneider
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~rbrown/families/webster.html: pg 93-95
"Welles, Wid. Elizabeth, Wethersfield-died in 1683. Children, Robert Foot, (died before her,) Sarah Judson, deceased-left children, daughters Churchill, Goodrich, Barnard and Smith. Nathaniel Foot's eldest son -Nathaniel and his brother and their children shared in her will, Daniel and Elizabeth-grandson John Stoddard grandsons Joseph and Benjamin Churchill. She was a sister of John Deming, sen'r. and had a grandson Henry Buck."
DWS: she had no childen by her 2nd marriage to Gov Thomas Welles.


Capt Jonathan Hale

DWS: The History of Ancient Wethersfield, Connecticut Vol 2 Genealogies and Biographies of Ancient Wethersfield by Sherman W Adams and edited by Henry R Stiles A.M., M.D.pg 406-407
"6. Jonathan (Capt.). b. 21 Aug., 1696; he m. (1) 28 Nov., 1717, Sarah (dau. Dea. Benj.) Talcott, who d. 15 Jan., 1743, in 44th yr.: he m. (2) Hannah ---, who d. 26 May, 1749, in 54th yr. ; he prob. m. (3) Mrs. Mary ----, 'former wife of Mr. Josiah Hollister, Jr., late wife of Jonathan Hale, Esq.,' who d. 18 Jan., 1780, in 82d yr.-Weth. (Gl.) Ins. Esq. Jonathan d. 1772. "Here lies Interred the Remains of Jonathan Hale, Esq., who having served his Generation in Several Offices of Trust with Faithfulness, fell asleep, July 2d. A. D. 1772, in the 76th year of his Age."-Weth. (Gl) Ins. His s. Elizur, b. Glast., 15 Jan., 1724-5. grad. Y. C., 1742: studied med. and surgery and sett. (1746) in practice in Glast. He was an excellent phys. of dignified, though rough exterior, witty and sarcastic, but benevolent and very useful; be abounded in kind deeds, was generous in the use of his ppy. and advice to the needy. He d. at G., 27 May, 1790, in his 66 yr.: he m. 23 Mch., 1749, Abigail (dau- Joseph & Martha White) Hollister of G. who d. 9 Oct., 1807 ae. 79."

**************
DWS: from New England (Connecticut); Royals
by Gordon Fisher gfisher@shentel.net
on ancestry.com


Sarah Talcott

DWS: The History of Ancient Wethersfield, Connecticut Vol 2 Genealogies and Biographies of Ancient Wethersfield by Sherman W Adams and edited by Henry R Stiles A.M., M.D.pg 406-407


Lt Samuel Hale

DWS: The History of Ancient Wethersfield, Connecticut Vol 2 Genealogies and Biographies of Ancient Wethersfield by Sherman W Adams and edited by Henry R Stiles A.M., M.D.pg 406-407
"FAM. 2. Lieut. SAMUEL,2 (Samuel,1), of Glast., b. 1644-5; m. 20 June, 1670, Ruth (dau. Thomas) Edwards, who d. 26 Dec., 1682, ae. abt. 30; he m. (2) 1695, Mary (dau. Samuel & Elizabeth Hollister) Welles, b. 23 Nov., 1666. He, with his bro. John, were petitioners to Gen. Ct. 1690, for a town incorporation. See, also, Chapt. VII, Vol. I. He d. 1711: 'Here lieth inhumed the body of Mr. Samuel Hale, Esq., of late one of Her Majestie's Justices of the Peace, who d. on the 18th day of Nov Anno Dom., 1711, and in the 67th yr. of his age.' Weth. Ins. Wid. Mary Hale d. 18 Feb., 1715.
Samuel Hale, Glastonbury, Invt. 1400-05-05, taken 30 May, 1712 by Samuel Smith, Samuel Welles, Thomas Treat, Richard Smith. Will dated 20 February, 1708-9, I give to Samuel Hale my eldest son, to Jonathan, to David, to Benjamin. I give to Jonathan, Land which I had, have and ought to have for my wive's portion of the estate of her late father Capt. Samuel Welles, reserving the use thereof for my wife during her life. I give to my dau. Mary Hale, to my dau. Ruth Kimberly, to my grand sons Eleazer, Thomas and Samuel Kimberly. I give to my wife Mary Hale and make her residuary legatee.
SAMUEL HALE, Sen. (Seal.)
Witness Caleb Stanley, Thomas Bunce, Jr. Another Proviso is added 18 March, 1709-10. Witnessed, Thomas Hooker, Caleb Stanley, Jr. Signed, sealed, proven, 19 December, 1711.
Children (Weth. Rec. & Chapin's Glast. Cent.):"


Mary Welles

William Richard Cutter, *New England Families*, NY 1913, p 595
DWS: 2nd wife of Samuel Hale
***********
The Hollister family of America, Lieut. John Hollister, of Wethersfield, Conn., and his descendants, 1886 by Lafayette Wallace Case pg 32
*********
DWS Wethersfield Inscriptions


Lt Benjamin Talcott

DWS: found as TALLCOTT in cemetery inscription below and Talcott elsewhere
DWS: Wethersfield Inscriptions : a complete record of the inscriptions in the five burial places in the ancient town of Wethersfield, inluding the towns of Rocky Hill, Newington, and Beckley Quarter (in Berlin), also a portion of the inscriptions in the oldest cemetery in Glastonbury
by Edward Sweetser Tillotson 1899 pg 318
Glastonbury records:
"Here Lieth Inhumed the body of Deacon Benjamin Tallcott, who died on the 12 day of November, Anno Dom. 1727, in the 54 Year of his Age."


Sarah Hollister

New England Families Genealogies and Biographies of Ancient Wethersfield
Henry R Stiles New York Grafton Press 1904 VOL II pg 429-430
***********
DWS: Wethersfield Inscriptions : a complete record of the inscriptions in the five burial places in the ancient town of Wethersfield, inluding the towns of Rocky Hill, Newington, and Beckley Quarter (in Berlin), also a portion of the inscriptions in the oldest cemetery in Glastonbury
by Edward Sweetser Tillotson 1899 pg 319
Glastonbury records:
"Here lyes the body of Sarah, wife of Leut. Tallcott, who died Oct. 15th 1715 in ye 39 year of her age."
*************
DWS: The Hollister family of America, Lieut. John Hollister, of Wethersfield, Conn., and his descendants, 1886 by Lafayette Wallace Case pg 33
+19. Sarah,3 b. Oct. 25, 1676; m. Benjamin Talcott, Jan. 5, 1698-9.


Charles Degraw Fisher

DWS: from New England (Connecticut); Royals
by Gordon Fisher gfisher@shentel.net
on ancestry.com
Paternal uncle of Gordon Fisher

"Charles D. Fisher -- b. Apr 1872, NY m. Fannie Frances -- (perhaps), d. bef. 1945."
Alison Melin (AOL: Alison414; see under Emma FISHER), from 1920 MN soundex

Tom Russell has birthdate 27 Jan 1871 deathdate circa 1933

Also from Alison Melin, using also obits and city directories: "Charles D. Fisher -- In 1915, he was listed in obit as living in Minneapolis. In 1920, he lived at 2732 Humboldt Avenue South, Apt. 21, Minneapolis, age 48, wife wife Fannie, age 49, b. WI. No kids listed. E.D. 169, Sheet 4, Line 11. In 1924, he was listed in obit as living in Minneapolis. In 1944, he was not listed in Tully's obit."


Fannie Frances widow Codfisher

Paternal aunt by marriage of Gordon Fisher


Insp Gen Charles Wiley Fisher

: from New England (Connecticut); Royals
by Gordon Fisher gfisher@shentel.net
on ancestry.com
Charles Wiley /Fisher/ 1841-1924

"Paternal grandfather of Gordon Fisher
Asst Insp General
Database: St. Paul, Minnesota City Directories, 1889-91
Charles W Fisher
C St P M & O Ry Paymaster
Location 1 Location 2
Rosabel northwest corner fourth 264 Nash St. Paul MN 1890, 1891

Note confirmation of birthplace, Schenectady NY, under Charles Wiley FISHER +++,
despite entry from 12th US census below. Do you suppose the census taker
mistook "Schenectady" as "Kentucky"???

Also, it appears from entry under +++ that Charles and his brother Leander movedfrom Schenectady to Buffalo about 1858, where they remained, until about 1880,
which is when Charles went to MN. Further, Leander was in San Diego CA in 1912.
NOTE: See note under Leander.

From Methodist Episcopal Church Records, Sackets Harbor NY, received from
Jeannie Brennan, Genealogy Dept, Flower Memorial Library, 229 Washington St,
Watertown NY 13601, dated 10 Jan 1995:

21 Feb 1868 Charles W. Fisher Sgt. Major - Army
Sophia Camp Sackets Harbor

From the 12th US Census, 1900:

12 June 1900
City of St Paul (Minnesota), 5th Ward
Street: Irvine Park House Number: 47
Yrs Birth- Birthpl.
Birthpl.
Color Sex Birthdate Age Married place father mother
Fisher, Chas. W, W M Nov 1848 51 35 Kentucky Kentucky New York
-- Sophia C. W F Dec 1852 49 35 New York New York New York
-- Charles D. W M Apr 1872 28 S Minnesota Kentucky New York
-- Marjory M. W F Aug 1876 26 S Minnesota Kentucky New York
-- Dorothy H. W F May 1878 22 S Minnesota Kentucky New York
-- George C. W M Apr 1881 19 S Minnesota Kentucky New York
-- Roswell P. W M Jun 1883 17 S Minnesota Kentucky New York
-- Donald G. W M May 1888 12 S Minnesota Kentucky New York
-- McCrea W M Apr 1892 8 S Minnesota Kentucky New York

The entire family is also shown as being able to read, write and speak English.
Charles is shown as owning his dwelling.
(Last should be --, Tully McCrea)
From the St. Paul (MN) Dispatch, Feb 7, 1924:

"PAST STATE COMMANDER
OF G.A.R. DIES HERE
AT HOME OF DAUGHTER

CIVIL WAR VETERAN,
OLD RESIDENT, DIES

Major Charles W. Fisher, 83,
Was State Official for Many Years.

Major Charles W. Fisher, a veteran of the Civil war, for forty-four years a
resident of St. Paul and for many years a state official, died late Wednesday
at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Marjorie Scott, 1152 Lincoln Avenue. He
was 83 years old.
Funeral services will take place at 2:30 P. M. Friday at the home of his
daughter, Mrs. Emory Mortensen, 1535 Grand avenue, Dr. H. C. Swearingen
officiating. Burial will be in Oakland cemetery.

Was Appointed Captain
At the outbreak of the Civil war, Major Fisher was commissioned as a second
lieutenant in I company, 10th [should be 104th !] New York Volunteers.
During his first engagement his captain and first lieutenant were killed and
he was appointed captain, remaining in command of the company until he was
wounded at the battle of Gettysburg, later being captured and imprisoned at
Libby prison where he was confined for several months before an exchange of
officers was effected.
At the close of the war, when he had attained the rank of major, he was
stationed at Madison barracks, New York, where he married Miss Sophie [should
be Sophia!] Hale Camp, daughter of Colonel George Camp. Mrs. Fisher died
seven years ago.

Held State Position
Major Fisher later resigned from the army and served for several years as an
appointed official of the state of New York. In 1880 he came to St. Paul as
paymaster of the Omaha railroad, resigning that position when he was
appointed assistant inspector general of Minnesota, which position he held,
under Governors Lind, Van Sant, Hammon 1 [sic], Johnson and Eberhardt.
He was active in the G. A. R. for many years and was at one time state
commander of the Minnesota department.
Three daughters, Mrs. Scott and Mrs. Emory Mortensen of St. Paul and Mrs.
Scott McMasters of Nashwauk, Minnesota, and five sons, Charles D.,
Minneapolis; Allan B., George C. and Tully M. of St. Paul, and Rosswell F. of
Norfolk, Va., survive."

State of Minnesota death certificate (Ramsey county) lists as cause of death
"valvular heart disease," with "artero-sclerosis" contributing.
National Archives *Certificate of Medical Examination," Pension Claim No.
114258, dated 21 Sep 1921, states that Charles W. FISHER was on this date: "Very
feeble (senility). Great deformity of left elbow; disabled Rt ankle and wound of
left knee. Did not recognize me although he has known me intimately for 30
years. (P) This man has aged greatly, and though during all of my knowledge of
him he has been weak and infirm he is now in a pitiable condition. This as a
result of service and advance of years." The form also states that the origin of
his disabilities was: "Compound Fracture of R ankle (Potts' [?]) at 2nd Battle
Bull Run. Wounded in Left knee at Gettysburg. Wound of Left Elbow at 2nd
Battle of Bull Run."


"One Hundred and Fourth Regiment N.Y.S. Vols., in the field on the first day of
Dec., 1863."
Col. Gilbert G. Prey Oct 21, 1862 (date of rank)
Lt. Col. John R. Strang Nov 7, 1863
Major [vacant]
Adjutant George L. Snyder Aug 31, 1862
Quartermaster Henry V. Colt Jan 11, 1862
Surgeon Enos G. Chase Nov 29, 1862
Assistant Surgeon George S. Rugg Nov 29, 1862
Assistant Surgeon Charles H. Richmond Aug 18, 1862
Chaplain Daniel Russell Mar 15, 1862

[Officers of Companies A-H, K omitted]

Company I:
Capt. Charles W. Fisher Sep 17, 1862 (date of rank)
1st Lt. John Daly do
2d Lt. James H. Cain do

Strength of Company I as of 1 Dec 1863, 36. Strength of 104th NY Volunteers as
of that date, 380.

Note that the Captain of Company B was Henry A. Wiley, and William R. Swinarton,
who sent me this information asks if this is a relation. Good question!

*Annual Report of the Adjutant General of the State of New York, Transmitted
to the Legislature, February 1, 1864, vol. II, Albany NY, 1864, p 216-218.
Address of Swinarton: 38 Howell Square, Scarborough, Ontario, M1B 1C4,
CompuServe 72773,2655

Excerpts from: Raymond G Barber and Gary E Swinson (ed.), *The Civil War
Letters of Charles Barber, Private, 104th New York Volunteer Infantry*,
privately published by Gary E Swinson, 20705 Wood Ave, Torrance CA 90503, 1991.

p 7-8: "According to a 1908 newspaper article describing an annual reunion of
the 104th N.Y. Volunteer Infantry:

'Immediately after the first battle of Bull Run in July 1861, Gen. Wadsworth
requested Col. John Rorbach of Geneseo, N.Y., to raise a regiment of infantry.'

In Oct., 1861, the regiment was recruited with its rendezvous at Geneseo,
Livingston Co, N.Y., under Col. John Rorbach. It was first called the Wadsworth
Guards in honor of General James Wadsworth of Geneseo. A recruitment notice for
Company A of the 104th Regiment (Wadsworth Guards), organized as part of the 1st
Brigade, 2nd Division, 1st Corps, read as follows:

'WAR, WAR, WAR:
COME ONE, COME ALL
AND ENLIST IN A FIRST CLASS COMPANY:

Company A

Commanded by Capt. H. G. Tuthill of Nunda and Lieut. L. C. Skinner, the first
Company organized and in first class Regiment.

The Wadsworth Guards

Are now in camp at Camp Union, Geneseo and are to be attached to Gen.
Wadsworth's Brigade.

This Company is now organized and nearly full, consequently only a few more
volunteers wanted.

Pay $13 to $23 Per Month: and $100 bounty at close of the War; or time of
discharge and all other enrollments received by any other Regiment. Pay rations
and Uniforms furnished from date of enlistment.

Volunteers may enlist and be forwarded to the camp by applying to S. A. Ellis,
78 State Street, Rochester or at our tent on the camp ground where are now
quartered at Camp Union, Geneseo, Livingston Co, New York.

Capt. H. G. Tuthill
Lieut. L. C. Skinner
Recruiting Officers'


The companies of the 104th N. Y. Regiment were recruited principally from the
following N. Y. localities:

Company A Nunda
Company B Springwater
Company C Centerville, Eagle, and Pike
Company D Geneseo
Company E Groveland, Cohocton, and Burns
Company F Rochester
Company G Fowlerville, Alabama, and Gainesville
Companies H and I Troy
Company K Troy and Cohoes."

p 19-26: "On Feb. 26, 1862, the guards left Geneseo, N.Y. for Albany, N.Y.
This event was reported in a local newspaper:

'Arrival and Departure of the Wadsworth Guards

The announcement that the Wadsworth Guards would pass through the city last
night on their way from Geneseo to Albany, caused quite a commotion, equal to
that which attended the early movement of troops to the seat of war last spring.
The hour for the arrival of this regiment was fixed at four o'clock, and at that
time there were hundreds of people gathered at the Geneseo Valley Depot, and
there hundreds continued to wait until six o'clock, when the train arrived. The
regiment did not leave Geneseo until four o'clock, and then in a train of 15
cars, under charge of conductor John Davenport.

The arrival of the train was greeted with cheers from the multitude at the
Depot. The regiment fell into line at once to march to the Central Depot. It was
accompanied by McArthur's fine brass band of Mt. Morris, which had volunteered
to accompany the regiment to this city. The soldiers marched through Exchange
and State streets, the Band playing lively airs, the multitude cheering all
along and the ladies from the windows and balconies waving their white
handkerchiefs to the regiment. It was a pleasing spectacle, and yet an
affecting one. We never see a regiment or company going from home toward the
field without feeling a sadness of reflection, mingled with our gladness that
our country can command such volunteers to risk their lives in its defense.

The special train on the Central Road did not leave till 9:45, and was then
composed of 17 cars. The regiment remained at the Central Depot nearly three
hours, meanwhile our citizens had an opportunity to see the officers and men,
many of whom had friends and acquaintances in this city.

The Wadsworth Guards are organized as follows:
John Rorbach, Colonel.
Henry V. Colt, Quartermaster.
Enos J. [or G.] Chase, Surgeon.
Daniel Russell, Chaplain.
Co. A -- Capt., H.G. Tuthill; 1st Lieut., L.C. Skinner; 2d do., A.S. Haver.
94 men.
Co. B -- Capt., L.H. Day; 1st Lieut., H.A. Wiley. 74 men.
Co. C -- Sapt., S.L. Wing; 1st Lieut., Henry Runyan; 2d do., N.J. Wing. 77
men.
Co. D -- Capt., Zopher Simpson; 1st Lieut., C.H. Young. 78 men.
Co. E -- Capt., H.C. Lattimore; 1st Lieut., W.T. Lozier. 56 men.
Co. F -- Capt., A. Kendall; 1st Lieut., J.P. Rudd. 57 men.
Co. G -- Capt., J.A. Gault; 1st Lieut., W.J. Hemstreet. 49 men.
Co. H -- Capt., G.G.Prey; 1st Lieut., L.F. Daow. 71 men.
Co. I -- Capt., J.H. Stull; 1st Lieut., H. Stull. 71 men.
Co. K -- Capt., L.L. Carter; 1st Lieut., W.L. Tremly. 34 men.

About seventy men of this Regiment were left behind. There are twelve in the
hospital, some are just out of the hospital and a few are absent on furlough.
It is expected that most of these men and some others will join the Regiment at
Albany in ten days. The Depot at Geneseo is left in charge of Capt. S.L. Wing.

The Regiment on its arrival at Albany this afternoon will go into the Barracks
in that city under the expectation to remain about two weeks, receive its arms
and equipments in full and then go Southward, probably to Washington.

The Wadsworth Guards, officers and men, made a good impression upon our citizens
last night. The remark was general that the men looked well and demeaned
themselves like soldiers. The officers are gentlemen, and it is safe to predict
for them and their command a successful career in the field. Success to the
Regiment, and a safe return to every officer and private.

Capt. Stull, of this Regiment, remained in this city and will be here until
Monday evening next to receive recruits. He will take a dozen or so of good men
who may desire to join the Regiment. He may be found at 44 Exchange st.

P.S. -- The special train conveying this Regiment eastward was detained at
Syracuse until 5 o'clock this morning in consequence of a freight train being
off the track. The Regiment was expected to reach Albany at 3 this P.M.' "


p 26: "On their arrival in Albany, the ten companies of which the regiment was
composed -- some of whom were mere skeletons -- were consolidated into seven;
and a skeleton regiment then recruiting at Troy, N.Y., was consolidated into
three companies and added to the regiment, making a full regiment of 1,000 men
which was numbered the 104th.

The original regimental Officers and Captains were: Colonel John Rorbach,
Lieut. Colonel R. Wells Kenyon, Major L. C. Skinner, Adjutant Frederick T.
Vance, Quartermaster Henry Colt, Company A Captain Tuthill, Company B Captain L.
H. Day, Company C Captain Stephan L. Wing, Company D Captain Zopher Simpson,
Company E Captain H. C. Lattimore, Company F Captain Prey, Company G Captain J.
A. Gault, Company H Captain Sellick, Company I Captain McCaffry, [RGB]."

p 34: "[About April 1862] The 104th Regiment went into camp on Kalorona Hill
near the city, and were attached to General Duryea's Brigade, General Ricketts'
Division. Duryea's Brigade was composed of the 97th N.Y., 104th N.Y., 105th
N.Y., 88th Pa., and the 107th Pa. The Division was part of the 3rd Corps, Army
of Virginia, under General Irvin McDowell. [RGB]"

p 36: "Camp Wadsworth near Washington D C Apr 3rd - 1862 ..... I am well and
hearty our camp is on high dry ground we have good water better than I
expected I think it is a healthy camp ground here our regt is healthy
excepting about two hundred of our men and boys that have got diseases from
abandoned women there is 175 been to our surgeon to get cured they gor cold
on the march and had a hard time of it some of them are married men."
And a little later: "one of our men is in the guard house for threatening to
shoot our Captain he is being Court martialed to day it may go hard with him
he has a wife and two children." But from a later letter of Apr 13th 1862:
"The man who was under arrest for threatning [sic] to kill Captain Tuthill has
had his trial he was condemed [sic] and then pardoned when I get home I can
tell thousands of stories that I cannot write."

p 57: "Catlett station 50 mile from Washington June 7 - 62. Dear wife and
children I am well excepting being weak from the effects of diarhoea all the
regt have got it or had it so we are reported unfit for duty for four weeks we
have moved our camp two mile where we have good water and high ground the
effects of our retreat made some sick ten have gone to the hospital at
Washington: one of our man [sic] was shot through the head accidentally and died
in five hours another was shot in his hand while drawing a charge from his gun
our Captain and Colonel are both sick there is only 250 men fir for duty out of
the whole regiment. but only four that are dangerous a good many of our
officers talk of resigning and return home some think the whole regiment will
be disbanded as we are no benefit to the service and cannot be at present we
got more tents yesterday we slept with out tents over a week it rained every
night and nearly all of us was sick so on the whole we have seen considerable
hard times we expect to be paid next week five months pay is due us now.
..... I look for a speedy termination of the war I still hope to be home in July"

p 68: "The Regiment was next ordered to Warrenton, Va., where they rejoined the
rest of the Brigade [July 1862]. On their return, they found that General
Duryea's command had been assigned to General James B. Ricketts Division wherein
they remained until after Antietam. [RGB]"

p 73: "we are now all under Gen Pope over 100,000 men our regt belongs in Gen
Durryeas [sic] brigade and Gen Rickets [sic] division and all under Gen Pope
we may see hard fighting in a few days and we may never see any fighting no
one can tell"

p 79-80: "Aug. 8, 1862, found the 104th at Cedar Mountain and there the
Regiment was brought under fire for the first time in the Battle of Cedar
Mountain, Va., on Aug. 9, 1862. At Cedar Mountain, General Nathaniel Banks'
Corps of General John Pope's Federal Army of Virginia "drove in sharply and
successfully against two of [General Stonewall] Jackson's divisions until the
third Jackson division, under A. P. Hill, came up to stem the tide and
counterattack. ..... Federal casualties were ... 2,381 [killed, wounded and
missing] of the 8,000 engaged. The Confederates had about 16,800 men and
suffered 1,341 casualties." ... There were no losses in the 104th. After the
battle, the defeated Union Army retreated back across the Rappahannock River.
[RGB]" [Then from one of Barber's letters:]

on Battle field 8 mile south of Calpeper Va [sic] Aug 11 - 1862

Dear wife and children

I am well we rec orders to march the day I wrote my last we heard a heavy
cannonade and we had orders to march we got in two or 3 mile of the field and
began to meet the wounded the cannon and musketry still raged but stoped just
as we got to the field and we supposed the battle was over the mail came in
just then and it was near dark we lit candles to read our letters and I was
just reading your letter read one page when the rebels commenced firing again
their shot and shell flew all around us one shell struck in 30 feet of me we
was ordered to advance in to a valley and lie down our cannon now answered the
rebels sending shot and shell rite over our heads as we lay between the rebels
artillery and our artillery and there we lay till eleven oclock at night the
shot and shell and grape shot flying not ten feet over our heads the rebels was
not forty rods off but we was not allowed to fire as it would reveal our
position to them the first regt on our right broke and run our regt never
waver Gen McDowell and Gen Durryea both said they never see a regt so cool or
behave better the first time they was in battle I suppose the object was to
have us charge bayont on the rebel battery but the rebels spiked their guns and
ran they have made another stand 2 or 3 mile off both armies are reinforced
by 60 or 70 thousand on each side we expect a heavy battle to day or tomorrow

Yours in haste I must get ready for battle I will write again soon as I can
I feel perfectly cool and was cool in the battle but a battle field is an awful
scene kiss the babies

C Barber"


[CONTINUED FROM Charles Wiley FISHER]

p 80: "Eight mile from Culpeper, Va.
Aug. 14 1862

Dear wife and children

I am well and our brigade is still on the ground where it was when I wrote last.
The rebels have retreated and our advance is after them. Our regiment expects to
advance in a day or two. Our company has just come in from picket duty. Our
picket lines were on the battle ground and we viewed the spot where we lay when
the shell and grape shot were flying over us. One volley of musketry was fired
at us the bullets flew all around us but none of our regiment were hurt. Two
of the 105 were wounded. It seemed strange that as much as they fired at us and
being so near us that we escaped. The night was still and the moon shone bright
and clear. It was a grand scene. First it would be still as death then the
heavy report of canon [sic] would jar the ground where we lay and a stream of
fire would follow the shells over our heads where we lay. As near as we can
learn there are two or three thousand killed and wounded on our side and more on
the rebels side. The dead are not all buried yet and horses lay torn to pieces
on the field. The wounded have been going to Culpepper in ambulances for two
days. It is an awful scene. We expect another fight in a few days. Several of
the generals are here. None of the Java boys were in the battle but the two
Thomas boys [George and William] and myself. The rest were sick in the rear
except George Stryker. He was acting as guard over our beef cattle in the rear.

Good bye Charles Barber

p 81: "The 104th took part in Pope's campaign in Northern Virginia, Aug. 16 --
Sept. 2, 1862, including: fords of the Rappahannock River, Aug. 21-23;
Thoroughfare Gap, Va., Aug. 28; Groveton, Va., Aug. 29; Bull Run, Va., Aug. 30;
and Chantilly, Va., Sept. 1. [Dyer].

"On the banks of the Rapidan river Va
Aug 17 -- 1862

Dear wife and children I have just read your good long letter and it done me
good to read it I am well we have marched on six mile and lay rite in the
front of the enemy our cannon are ready and so is the rebels we are about
two mile off we some expected a fight last night we may have one to day.
the baggage wagons was sent to the rear last it is Sunday to day most of the
fighting is done Sundays we marched the whole length of the late battle field
it was an awful sight some of the men was only half buried and bushels of
maggots was on them. they was not buried deep enough perhaps before you read
this I may see the carnage of another battle but it still seems to me that I
shall finally get home safe. you keep writing to me direct as usual the mail
routes and telegraph and rail roads follow up the army. the way prospects is
dark and none can tell the future I do not think it will end at present I
think foreign mediation will end it in less than nine months Europe is now
disscussing [sic] the question of trying to make peace here

[Added] My dar wife I did not know how much I loved you till since we parted
last and how I love our children when I get home I shall have many stories to
tell that will interest you and the children and we can whil away the long
winter evenings verry agreeable I can tell of my privations and hardships that
I do not try to write about. but I am not afraid nor discouraged nor I am not
sorry I enlisted. I was surprised at myself to see how cool I was on the battle
field we have an inspection this morning I must get ready now good bye in
haste from you lover husband

Charles Barber

I send you two more rebel bills"

p 84-85,88 [with regard to the battles of Thoroughfare Gap and 2nd Bull Run (2nd
Manassas]:


[LETTER 1] Camp ten mile from Washington
Sept 4th 1862

Dear wife & Children I am well we have not been allowed to send letters till
now I had just closed my last letter to you when the battle commenced I have
been in five terrific battles and had many narrow escapes our army has been
fighting constantly for 27 days but our regt has been in only five days fighting
but we have been marching fighting constantly for 30 days both night and day
we have scarcely had a full nights rest in a month. our regt is badly cut up
we have less than two hundred men left out of our whole regt of one thousand Men

our general was wounded three times one our liutenants [sic] was killed a
piece of shell struck Capt Tuthills leg but did not hurt him much the same
piece wounded another man that was in three feet of me George Stryker recd a
ball in his chin and a slight wound on top of his head Edgar Fancher is missing
we just heard he is a prisoner our orderly sergeant is a prisoner four of our
Com is still missing a ball went between my legs another went between me and
Edgar and a good many whistled near my head our regt charged bayonet once and
drove the rebs and they was reinforced and charged us our division is now
ordered back to here."


[LETTER 2]: "Near Arlington heights ten mile from Washington
Sept 5 -- 1862

Dear wife and children

I wrote you a few hasty words yesterday and closed abruptly as the mail was
leaving now I will finish my yesterdays letter as I said I had just sealed
my last letter to you when the battle commenced by a heavy cannonade which
lasted two hours the rebs was to [sic] strong for us three to one so the
order was give to blow up the bridge and fall back so we have been fighting and
falling back for near a month till we are back to Washington the rebs having
the advantage of a superior force and a skillful General while Gen McDowel is
charged with treason on our side

we have marched night and day and been three days with nothing but dry hard
crackers to eat we also suffered greatly for water hundreds and thousands
fell out by the way overcome with heat and choked with dust and suffering from
hunger and thirst and sore feet last friday night at dark we lay on the old
bull run battle ground where they had been fighting all day we slept there
that night and at sunrise marched on two mile where we met the enemy in strong
force. the dead that was killed the day before still lay there and some of the
wounded when our line was formed my heels was touching a dead man that lay close
behind with a bullet through his forehead a wounded man lay within a feet
[sic] of me having laid there all night one of our lieut gave him wayer we
soon had a fierce fight which lasted two hours we then had orders to fall back
which we done in good order our regt having lost 37 men in killed and wounded
and 100 missing I was perfectly cool loaded and fired my gun as coolly as if
I was shooting squirrels but I had many narrow escapes. we now eat dinner and
went with a reinforcement the rebs also was reinforced they had three times
our number so we had another hard fight in the afternoon both infantry and
artillery on both sides. six thousand rebs now come up to charge bayonet on
our batteries but our regt and one other regt charged bayonet on them without
knowing their strength the rebel right wing fell back before our charge but
soon rallied and their whole force now charged bayonet on us our Gen now saw
the rebel strength and ordered us to retreat which we did on double quick amid
the yells and bullets from six thousand rebels a good many fell before this
charge our Gen was wounded three times and had a man hold him on his horse
while he conducted the retreat Geo Stryker rec his wound in this charge Edgar
[Fancher] was taken prisoner Wm and Geo Thomas and myself come out safe none
the other Java boys was in the battles they being sick Walter [Steele] is here
now Joe [prob Joseph Steele] and Andrew [prob Andrew J Fancher] are in
hospital so is Pratt my tent mate we are now resting under the big guns of
the forts where we expect to rest a few days and let some other regts fight
while we rest."

p 90: "Mechanicksville Maryland
twenty mile north of Washington
Sept 10th 1862

.....

the rebs are in Maryland and threatening Penn. it seems some our generals
are traitors or incompetent but I think the war is near its end some [of]
our officers think it will end in 30 days the rebel prisoners say this is
Jacksons last struggle and it will end in three weeks. one thing I think
is certain and that is the war cannot last long I shall not try to write
all the hard ships I have seeb nor I shall not try to describe the horrid
carnage of the battle field but when I get home (which I hope will be soon)
I can tell many of the hard bloody tales of war and narrow escapes from
shells cannon balls grape musketry and cavalry

our regt has never wavered nor faltered on the battle field nor retreated
without orders but one regt on our left and two on our right brokew and fled
with dismay leaving us exposed to a galling fire of grape shell and musketry
our regt had over a thousand men when we left NY but now we have only 200 men
left: sickness death desertion and the battle field has taken away over four
fifths of our number our brigade of four thousand men is not reduced to 800 men
and we are a dirty ragged lousy war worn foot sore set of fellows but not
dicouraged

..... "

p 92, 94: "In the morning of Sept. 16, 1862, the Brigade [Duryea's] marched
southwest toward a village named Sharpsburg. As night began to close in, the
Brigade reached the edge of a corn field some forty rods beyond the dwelling of
Mr. George Line. Here they formed a column by divisions and marched through the
corn field. Wheeling to the left, they reached the crest of a gentle swell of
land. By the time the Brigade reached the edge of a piece of woods about a
quarter of a mile to the front, it was dark, and they laid down on their arms
for the night, only a few hundred yards from the enemy.

It was learned that the enemy in their front consisted on Jackson's Division.
At the first of dawn on Sept. 17, 1862, skirmishing began at the front. General
Hooker, who now commanded the 1st Corps, ordered the advance and in a few
moments, the whole line was furiously engaged. Duryea's Brigade advance was
across a plowed field and through a corn field. For a while they drove the
enemy before them, but Confederate reinforcements were brought up and they in
turn were compelled to fall back, leaving long lines of dead across the field.
This ended the 104th's part in the Battle of Antietam. In these few minutes,
the regiment lost about 100 men. Today, there is a monument to mark the spot of
their advance. [RGB]

Sharps point near the Potomac
Sept 19th 1862

Dear wife and children I am well and unhurt our regt has been in two more
terrible battles and all cut to pieces our regt lost 100 killed and wounded
our company had fourteen wounded which was half of our company that was in the
battle Wm Thomas got a ball through his hand Walter [Steele] got the end of
his thumb shot off Geo Thomas and I got through sage no other Java boys was
in the battles Capt Tuthill had three fingers shot off and a ball in his leg
he was carried off the field our com had two sergeants wounded two of our boys
lost each a leg by a shell I helped off a wounded man and returned to my post
my left hand man fell shot and the nest moment my right hand man fell shot in
the thigh and I helped him off the field to the hospital our brigade was now
relieved and fell back and I helped the wounded for three hours oh such
ghastly wounds such horrid sights and heart sickning scenes no tongue nor pen
can tell. the battle raged all day the rebs have retreated south of the
Potomac we are now in hot pursuit we have stopped to eat and rest while I am
writing this I hear a cannonade in the advance we may soon have another fight
I have been lucky so far I think the war is soon to end and I hope to be home
soon write as usual

yours in haste

good bye
Charles"

p 105: "As the fog rose in midmorning from the plain southeast of
Fredericksburg, Federal troops drove toward the hills defended by Jackson's
Confederates ... Spirited assaults by troops of George C. Meade and John Gibbon
[including the 104th] dented Jackson's lines for a short time, but William B.
Franklin's Left Grand Division was repulsed and thrown back to the low ground
from whence it started ..... This winter day at Fredericksburg tested men and
officers alike to the utmost. The heroism was there, but not the strategy .....
The cost -- 1,284 Federals were killed, 9,600 wounded, and 1,769 missing, a
total of 12,653 casualties for the proud Army of the Potomac. An estimated
114,000 men were engaged. For the Confederates, 595 were killed, 4,061 wounded,
and 653 missing for 5,309 casualties of about 72,500 engaged. The result --
Federals remained in the city, Confederates on the hills. [E B & B Long, 1971].

Two mile from Fredricksburg Va
Dec 15 -- 1862

Dear wife and children I am well and hearty we have just been in another
hard fight our com had ten men wounded our regt lost 50 men and our regt
took 200 prisoners the man in front of me and the man on my left was again
shot same as Antietam I helped one of them off the field he lost his arm

Geo Thomas and I got through safe no other of the Java boys was in we expect
more fighting soon the rebs are a mile off the pickets are firing now
yours in haste

Charles

Write soon as you get this"

p 127 "Charles Barber's next letter tells the part the 104th had in the Battle
of Chancellorsville, Va. Union Major General Hooker was defeated by Confederate
General Robert E. Lee. "The Federals had at least 133,868 men at
Chancellorsville and Fredericksburg; 1,606 were killed, 9,762 wounded, and 5,919
missing for a total of 17,287 casualties between April 27 and May 11 [1863].
Confederate effectives are estimated at 60,000, with 1,665 killed, 9,081
wounded, and 2,018 missing for a total of 12,764." Major General T. J.
("Stonewall") Jackson was wounded during the battle and subsequently died on May
10, 1863, a great loss to the South. [Long, RGB]

Camp near White Oak Church Va May 13 -- 1863

Dear wife and children

I am well I rec yours stating that you had rec the money

our army still lies here under orders to be ready to march at a moments notice
we may march to day or we may stay here a month

the weather is getting hot our regt was verry luckey through this last
campaign we only had three men wounded two them belonged to our Company we
was in two skrimishes one ball whistled three feet over my head that was the
closest call I had but we was constantly under arms for five days expecting to
fight at every moment I did not sleep a minute for four days and nights the
hardest fighting was one mile from where we lay it was the most terriffic I
ever see or heard we expected to engage but the rebs fell back we lay in the
rifle pits with our loaded rifles resting on the bank expecting the enemy to
advance on our line there would [have] been a great slaughter if they had come
for our artillery could [have] swept the field with grape and canister shot
while our rifles would not [have] thrown away many shots the rebs claim a
victory but they lost 20,000 men a few more such victories will kill the whole
rebel army they have lost several of thier best generals some of our
officers think the way is soon to end

our regt now belongs to the first brigade the second division and the first army
core we are under general Reynolds and Col Root has command of our brigade and
Col Tuthill has command of our regt our Capt is discharged so Lieut R R Weed
has command of our Company we are on the left wing of the army. Well keep
good courage and hope for the best I am not discouraged nor I am not sorry I
enlised I hope and expect to return home when I can tell you of a thousand
incidents that I cannot write now the longer I stay away the more anxious I am
to see you and our children Oh when can I be again permitted to see home and
family I hope to sometime before long have Geo work out or go to school if
he does not stay to Personses see if Mr. Smith dont want him I had rather he
would be nearer home

well let us love hope and trust and pray and justice will be done and we may
again meet and be happy good bye

Charles Barber"


[CONTINUED UNDER Charles Wiley FISHER ++]

[CONTINUED FROM Charles Wiley FISHER +]

p 132, 134-136: "Battle of Gettysburg, Pa.

The 104th arrived at Gettysburg, Pa., at 2 A.M. on July 1, 1863. They were
ordered to take up a position along the Mummasburg Road on Seminary Ridge. By
the afternoon, General Paul's 1st Brigade was the sole remining reserve of the
1st Corps. They were double quicked to the right and ordered to take position
to the right of Baxter's Brigade, facing partly to the west and partly to the
north. The 13th Mass. was on the right and the 104th on the left.

The Confederate Brigades of Daniel and O'Neal advanced and partly seized the
stone wall running along the ridge, southerly from the road. Coming rapidly
into line, the 104th encountered a destructive fire from the rebel forces who
were behind the stone wall. The Regiment sustained a heavy loss in killed and
wounded in this position. Finally, under the personal leadership of Colonel
Prey, the Regiment charged over the stone wall, dislodging the rebel forces and
driving them back in confusion. Quite a few prisoners were taken by the
companies of Captains Wiley and Dixon.

It was now nearly 3 P.M. on July 1, 1863, and the whole plain to the north and
west of Gettysburg seemed to be filled with Confederates. The 104th retired
behind the stone wall and kept up a well-directed musket fire. About this time,
General Paul was severely wounded, losing the sight of both eyes. The two
senior Colonels were successively wounded. Colonel Prey took command. About
this time, Sergeant Joseph Wallace, by a clever move, stripped the colors from
the staff and hid them under his coat; this may be all that saved them from
being captured by the Confederates. The 11th Corps on the right of the Union
line finally gave way. This left the 1st Brigade open for a murderous
enfilading fire. The Regiment was forced to fall back and through the town.
Having been on the extreme right of the Corps, a good many of the men were cut
off and captured before they could reach the town. A monument now marks the
spot of the 104th's stand. [Picture in text]

Arriving at the rear of Cemetery Hill about 6 P.M. on July 1, the Regiment
gathered together what remained of it. They found three officers and 43 men
left out of 330 who had gone into the batter. By the morning the second day,
the number had increased to about 100 [?? what number??]

On the evening of the second day, July 2, 1863, the Regiment had a part in
recovering the line and saving some of the artillery near the "Peach Orchard".
On the third day, July 3, 1863, they were just in the rear of Cemetery Hill
during the cannonade of Lee's artillery. On the close of the cannonade, they
moved rapidly to the right and across Cemetery Hill to the left, arriving there
just in time to see Pettigrew's rebel division, which was to have supported
Pickett's broken and bleeding division, retreating back across the field. This
ended the Battle of Gettysburg. :The sacualty figures for the three day battle
were staggering. For the Federals, out of a total engaged of over 85,000 men,
3,155 died, 14,529 were wounded, and 5,365 missing for a total of 23,049. For
the Confederates, whose strength was near 65,000, official losses were 2,592
killed, 12,709 wounded, and 5,150 missing for 20,451." [Long] The 104th's
losses were: killed or died of wounds, 29; wounded, 78; captured or missing, 88;
total losses, 195. [RGB]

Middleton Md
July 8 1863

Dear wife and children

I seize the first opportunity since the great battle to inform you of our
safety. We had hard marching and hard fighting when we met the enemy at
Gettysburg Pa.

Our corps were in the hardest of the fight. Out regiment is nearly annihilated.
We went in with 235 men and have less than fifty left. Not a single captain and
just one Lietenant is left in our whole regiment. Company A went in with thirty
men and now we have only seven here and not a single officer of any kind except
one Sergeant. Both our Lieutenants are taken prisoners one of them being
wounded. Our Orderly Sergeant was shot dead.

We know of over half our company being killed or wounded besides eight or nine
that we have not heard from that we expect are orisoners and probably some of
them are wounded. Every field officer of our regiment was wounded or taken
except the Colonel and Major they are here now. Our Java boys were very
lucky. Edgar [Fancher] got his fore finger shot off George Thomas was struck
on the thigh by a piece of spent shell doing him but little harm. A cannon ball
struck a tree just over my head and a sliver struck my hand. The next day a
cannon ball struck a big rock near me and a piece of rock struck my other hand.
Neither one hurt or scared me.

There was no cowardice in our regiment. George Thomas and George Stryker fired
sixty rounds each. We were under fire three days and on the skirmish line the
fourth day skirmishing with the rear guard of the enemy after thei main army had
retreated. That was the way we spent the fourth day.

The rebels are crossing the Potomac and we are in hot pusuit. I hear a
cannonade now probably our advance has engaged their rear. We have stopped to
rest here a few hours.

Our Corps General was killed and so was our Brigadier. It was an awful bloody
time the hardest I ever say. It is the greatest battle of the war and our
victory is complete. Vicksburg is taken and yet Jefferson Davis says the war
has but just begun.

Out corps has marched over thirty miles a day in rain and mud and we may be in a
fight again in a few days

good bye
Charles Barber"


P 171-172: "Spotsylvania, Va.

At 8 A.M. on May 8, 1864, Robinson's Division advanced south to Spotsylvania
Court House where the Federal army found the victorious Confederate army waiting
for them. Robinson's Division was deployed into the clearing north of
Spotsylvania Court House and was fired upon by the Confederates on Spotsylvania
Ridge. General Robinson was badly wounded in the first battle. A line was
taken up east of the Brock Road near Alsop's Fram, and the Battle of
Spotsylvania was on. The troops in front of the 104th proved to be Robert E.
Rodes' Division of Richard S. Ewell's Corps, in position and entrenched.

They remained in position until 3:45 P.M. on May 10, 1864, when General Warren
was determined to make an attack which he lead himself. They were driven back
with heavy losses. In this attach, the 2nd, 5th, and 6th Corps lost 4,100 men
and gained nothing. [RGB] The series of battles known as Spotsylvania
continued through May 19, 1864. " ... the Federal casualties are put at around
17,5000 out of about 110,000 engaged. The confederates had probably over 50,000
engaged, but total losses are not reliably recorded." [Long]

Charles Barber's next letter tells of his being wounded during the Battle of
Spotsylvania Court House, Va. Charles was probably wounded on May 10, 1862, at
Laurel Hill, Va. The Division Hospital referred to by Charles in his letter was
at the J. Alsop Farm north of the battle site. [RGB]

Division Hospital three miles in the rear of the bloody battle
field near Spotsylvania Court House May 11th -- 1864

My Dear wife and children

I am well except a slight wound on my hip: I have been in three terrible
battles since I wrote to you last. I loaded and fired my gun till it was so hot
I could not hold it only by the stock and strap it was so foul I could hardly
ram a ball down so we stopped firing to cool and clean our guns and get more
cartridges then we went at it again till sun down when our whole line was
ordered to charge on the rebel breastworks we had advanced about two rods when
a cannon ball brushed my left hip and knocked me full ten feet against a pine
tree Geo Stryker and Walter [Steele] helped me off the field my wound was
dressed and I come here in an ambulance probably I shall return to the regt in
a few days. I fainted away twice.

yours in haste
Charles Barber

I will [write} again soon as I can"

p 181-182: "The following letter appeared in an undated newspaper article
reporting the "recent find" in Chicago, Ill., of "another" Charles Barber letter
written to his brother and sister and his wife's parents in Illinois.

St Pauls Church Hospital, Alexandria Va, Aug 2, 1864

Dear Father and Mother, Brothers and Sisters and all enquiring friends:

I am well excepting a lame back caused by the wound I received. I think that
that cannon ball jarred and injured my back bone. I am detailed here at the
hospital now to help take case of the sick and wounded. I have been here two
months and have got to be quite an expert hand among the sick and wounded. I do
not know how long I shall remain here, possibly I may serve my time out here or
I may be ordered to my regiment any day, but on the whole I think I shall remain
here a while longer. My time is out on the eighth day of October, but I don't
know but I shall have to serve till the first day of January, which is three
years from the day my regiment organized. I see by letters from my regiment that
it has loft over half its number since this campaign opened, less than 50 men
now remain in the ranks out of 1040 that came out three years agol a sad comment
on the ravages of war. As for myself I have been in 12 battles and had many
narrow escapes. I received two slight hits at Gettysburg but still kept my
place in the ranks but on the tenth day of last May in the battle of the
Wilderness [now known as the Battle of Spotsylvania Court House, Va] I was
knocked over by a cannon ball that come very close knocking me out of this world
of trouble but my time had not come yet for I was yet to go home and see my
family from whom I had been absent two years and five months and on the
twentieth of May I stepped across my threshold and stood in the presence of my
beloved family. You can perhaps imagine our feelings. I certainly cannot write
them. My children had grown but I knew them and I spent twenty-three days with
my family and it was 23 of the happiest days of my life and now it would be
wicked an ungrateful in me if I did not acknowledge with profound respect and
veneration the goodness of an overruling Providence in my fortunes and
misfortunes.

The great cause in which our nation is engaged must triumph. It would be wicked
to doubt it, but political parties may all go to smash. I hope they will [be]
but the great and broad principles on which rests the foundation of our
government must triumph, but the end of the war may not be yet.

Direct
St. Paul's Church Hospital
Alexandria, Va

Charles Barber"


p 185: "The 104th Regiment took part in an engagement at Weldon Railroad, Va.,
Aug. 18-21, 1864. [Dyer] On Aug. 18, they made a march of six or eight miles,
with the 5th Corps to which they belonged, and struck the Weldon Railroad about
three miles from Petersburg, Va.; this was called the Battle of Globe Tavern.
On the afternoon of Aug. 19, by some mismanagement on the part of the new
Division commander, General Samuel W. Crawford, nearly the whole Division was
captured. The 104th was ordered from the line in the midst of the engagement to
fill a gap between the 5th and 11th Corps. While moving on a byroad in the woods
to the designated point, the 104th was surrounded by the Heth Brigade of A. P.
Hill Corps, and was captured. Some did get away and kept the Regiment alive.
[RGB]

[THIS MAY HAVE BEEN WHERE Charles Wiley FISHER WAS CAPTURED
AND TAKEN TO LIBBY CONFEDERATE PRISON. RGB notes, p 198: "Prisoners from the
104th were not liberated until the general exchange of prisoners on Feb. 21,
1865. After that, they returned to the army of Petersburg, Va."]

On Aug 28 1864, Barber wrote from "Camp Distribution three mile north west of
Alexandria Va" that he was reported fit for duty by the "new Dr" at St. Paul's
Hospital in Alexandria, and was sent to this camp. On Sept 3 1864 he wrote from
the "Camp of 104 Regt Five mile from Petersburg VA" that he had rejoined his
regiment. He says, among other things: "I found our boys well what is left of
them but the old soldiers are nearly all gone. In only found 3 left with Co A
and Walter [Steele] is one of the three he is well Geo Thomas is well and is
with the Provost guards yet. ..... Our officers are all gone not on eleft; a
Captain of another regt now has charge of us ..... "

Charles Barber was mustered out (discharged) Oct 31, 1864, and wrote his wife
and children to this effect from City Point, Va, on Nov 1st, 1864.

The editor RGB [Raymond G. Barber] of Charles Barber's letters notes on p 198
that the 104th Regiment took part in the Appomatox Campaign, March 28 -- April
9, 1865, including the fall of Petersburg and surrender of Lee and his army
April 9, 1865. The Regiment then moved to Washinton, D.C. May 1-12 1865, and
stayed on duty there till July 1865. The Regiment was mustered out at Elmira,
Chemung Co., NY, July 17, 1865.

On p 200, the field and staff officers of the 104th NY Volunteer Infantry are
given as follows, taken from the records at the office of the Adjutant-General
of the state of New York:

Colonels: John Rorbach, Lewis C. Skinner, Gilbert G. Prey, George R. Strong

Lieutenant Colonels: R. Wells Kenyon, Lewis G. Skinner, Gilbert G. Prey, Henry
G. Tuthill, John R. Strong, Henry A. Wiley

Majors: Lewis C. Skinner, Gilbert G. Prey, John R. Strong, Henry V. Colt, Henry
A. Wiley, William C. Wilson

Adjutants: Frederick T. Vance, George S. Snyder, John R. Jarvis.

Quartermansters: Henry V. Colt, Seneca Warner, Jr.

Surgeons: Enos G. Chase, Charles H. Richard

Assistant Surgeons: George G. Rugg, Douglas S. Langdon, Charles H. Richard

Chaplains: Daniel Russell, Alfred C. Roe, Ferdinand De W. Ward

[END QUOTES FROM: *The Civil War Letters of Charles Barber, Private, 104th New
York Volunteer Infantry*, edited by Raymond G. Barber & Gary E. Swinson,
published by Gary E. Swinson, 20705 Wood Ave., Torrance CA 90503, 1991.]


********************************************************************** ****
*************

QUESTIONS: Was Charles Wiley FISHER with the 104th during the Appomatox
Campaign? (The release of prisoners taken by the Confederates was before this).
Was he present at the mustering out of the regiment? (Added May 1995: We know
Charles was discharged 11 Jul 1864 from 104th NY Vols, although he re-enlisted
later, probably in another outfit see above)

[CONTINUED IN Charles Wiley FISHER +++]

From Jennie, 4 Jan 1995 (although apparently received by here sometime in latter
part of 1994):

"RECEIVED FROM NEW YORK STATE ARCHIVES:

1. Letter headed "War Department, Washington City, May 20, 1892.

To the Adjutant General
State of New York, Albany, NY
Sir:
I am directed by the Secretary of War to inform you that, under the provisions
of the act approved June 3, 1884, and the acts amendatory thereof, Chas. W.
Fisher is considered by this Department as commissioned to the grade of 2
Lieut., Company I, 104 Regiment New York Volunteers this date Feb. 11, 1862.
Very respectfully,
F. C. Ainsworth
Major, U. S. Army.

2. Registers and Sketches of Organizations; p. 3219, One Hundred and Fourth
Regiment of Infantry (Veteran) NOTE: To be entered.

3. "Special orders No. 234, War Department, Adjutant General's office,
Washington, July 11th, 1864, (Extract) 33. Captain Charles W. Fisher, 104th
New York Volunteers, is hereby discharged the service of the United States, on
account of physical disability, and for absence without leave, as reported on
the rolls of his regiment. He will receive no final payments, until he has
satisfied the Pay Department that he is not indebted to the Government.
By order of the Secretary of War:
E. D. Townsend, Assistant Adjutant General

4. Certified Genealogists residing in NYS.

5. General information about archives.

6. A sheet with the following information: "Fisher, Charles W. Age 21 years.
Enlisted 9 January 1862 in Troy New York for 3 years. Mustered in 8 March 1862,
Grade 2d Lt., Company I, 104 Inf. Remuster 11 Feb 1862. Deb MJR (?) Discharged
11 July 1864. Explanation: See order attached for disability. (?) Remarks:
Present as Capt -- M. R. Apr 10/12, Apr 30, Dec/63, Feb/64. Capt vice J W Kelly
killed in action Dch MJR. Absent Oct/63, Aug/63. Commissioned 2nd Lieut, March
17, 1862 with rank from Jany 9. 1862 Original Captain, Oct 21, 1862 with rank
from September 17. 1862 vice J. Kelly killed in action. Com. dates 17 Sept 1862.
M. O. R. Apr 10/83. Recd 2nd Lieut. payt Oct 31/62. Has the dif bet leapt [?
-- prob Capt] and 2d lieut. Pay due from 17 Sep/62 to Oct 3/62 leapt [Capt?]
pay due to Apr 30/63. Apr 30. Wounded since July 1/63 without leave since Oct
15/63 [later retracted as an error, see below]. M. R. Oct/65 [63?]."


More from Jennie, received 4 Jan 1995:

"RECEIVED on New Years, 1995, from NATIONAL ARCHIVES; ordered 'complete' pension
records:

1. A "Drop Report-Pensioner" dated Mar 7 1924. Charles W. Fisher, Invalid,
Cert. No. 114258. 1152 Lincoln Ave, Flat 1, Saint Paul, Minn. "The name of the
above-described pensioner who was last pard at the rate of $72 per month to Feb
4 1924 has this day been dropped from the roll because of Death, Feb. 6, 1924."

2. "General Affidavit for any Purpose. State of California. County of San
Diego. In the matter of Increase Pension Claim account of Charles W. Fisher Co.
I 104 Reg't N.Y. Pension CTF. No. 114258. On this 27th day of November A.D.
1912 personally appeared before me, Isabel S. Sullivan, Notary Public, Leander
Fisher I.S.S.N.F. a resident of San Diego, County of San Diego, State of
California,who P.O. address #1310-D etc. San Diego, Calif., a respectable
citizen and entitled to credit, who, being duly sworn says that he is sixty-one
years of age; that he has no interest in said claim and makes the following
statement:

That Charles W. Fisher is the brother of Leander Fisher:
That Charles W. Fisher was born Sep. 22, 1841, in Schenectady, New York, and
Leander Fisher knows said date to be correct by virtue of family relations,
having lived in the same house with his brother for about twenty-eight years,
living in Schnectady (sic) for about seven years and in Buffalo, New York, for
about twenty-one years. The date of birth of Leander Fisher is Dec. 26, 1850,
and he is about nine years younger than his brother, Charles W. Fisher."

3. "General Affidavit for any Purpose, State of New York, County of Schnectady
(sic). In the matter of Increase Pension Claim account of Charles W. Fisher of
Co. I 104th Reg't N.Y. Inf'y. Pension Ctf. no. 114,258. On this eleventh day
of January A. D. 1913 personally appeared before me Clarence S. Hart a resident
of Schenectady County of Schenectady, State of New York whose P.O. address is
Schenectady, N. U. a respectable citizen and entitled to credit who being duly
sworn says that he is 42 years of age; that he has no interest in said claim and
makes the following statement:

In the matter of the application of the Adjutant General of the State of
Minnesota, for proof of birth of Charles W. Fihser, saud to have been born in
Schenectady, N. Y. Sept. 22, 1841, I hereby certify that there is no record of
this birth in this office, there being no vital statistics in this city prior to
April, 1882.
Clarence S. Hart, Registrar of Vital Statistics, City of
Schenectady"


4. "Officers Certificate of Disability.
Albany Aug. 4 1871

I, John Daly, formerly a Capt of Company I of the 104 Regiment of New York
Volunteers certify on honor that Charles W. Fisher was a Captain in Company I of
the 104 Regiment of New York Volunteers, and that said Charles W. Fisher was
discharged from said service on the 11 day of July A. D. 1864 at Annapolis Md.
by reason of certificate of disability.

And I further Certify, That the said Charles W. Fisher while with his Company &
Regiment & strictly in line of duty was engaged in the Battle of Bull Run Va.
Aug. 10/62 on the retreat in said Battle he stumbled fell & dislocated his left
Elbow, & same day was captured by the Rebels, & that department has been
informed & believes said dislocation received no treatment & is consequently now
deformed and disabled.
That said Charles W. Fisher while in command of his Company and strictly in line
of duty was engaged at the Battle of Gettysburgh [sic] Pa. received a Gun Shot
Wound in his left knee, the ball entering inside of leg just above the knee
joint.
I have no interest in C W Fishers claim for Pension. And that the said
Charles W. Fisher was a sound, healthy, sober man when he entered the said
Service."


5. "Army of the United States Certificate of Disability for Discharge. Sergeant
Charles W. Fisher of Captain G. E. Williamson's Company (F) of the Forty Second
Regiment of the United States Infantry was enlisted by Lieutenant Risley US Army
of the 42 Regiment of Infantry at Buffalo, N.Y. on the Second day of January,
1867, to serve three years; he was born in Schnectady (sic) in the State of New
York, is Twenty Four years of age, 5 feet 6 inches high, fair complexion, Blue
eyes, Brown hair, and by occupation when enlisted a Clerk. During the last two
months said soldier has been unfit for duty (zero) days. Borne upon the Company
Descrip live Book (?) with the remark, Wounded at Gettysburg, Pa. Jul 1, 1863.
Nothing farther known to the company Commander. Station: Madison Barracks, NY.
Date: March 25, 1869. Signed by Williamson, Captain 42 Infantry.

I certify, that I have carefully examined the said Sergeant Charles W. Fisher of
Captain S C Williamson's Company, and find him incapable of performing the
duties of a soldier because of Dislocation of left elbow by a fall at Bull Run
Va August 30, 1862. He was captured by the enemy & the dislocation received no
treatment, causing deformity & lost part of the motion of the joint. At
Gettysburg he was wounded through the lower thigh of left thigh.

Discharged, this Thirtieth day of March, 1869, at Madison Barracks, NY. The
Soldier desires to be addressed at Town Buffalo, County Erie, State New York."


6. "Army of the United States. To all whom it may concern: Know Ye that
Charles W. Fisher a Sergeant of Captain S. C. Williamson's Company G of the
Forty Second Regiment of Infantry who was enlisted the Second day of January one
thousand eight hundred and sixty seven to serve Three Years is hereby discharged
from the Army of the United States in consequence of Surgeons Certificate of
Disability under Army 1869.
Said Charles W. Fisher was born in Schenectady in the State of New York is 24
years of age 5 feet 6 inches high Fair complexion, Blue eyes, Brown hair and
by occupation when enlisted a Clerk.
Given under my hand at Madison Barracks, this Thirty First day of March in
the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty nine.

CHARACTER: Excellent in every respect. -- S. C. Williamson"


7. "Department of the Interior, Bureau of Pensions, Washington, D.C. January
15, 1898. Certificate No. 114258. Name Charles W. Fisher,

Sir:
In forwarding to the pension agent the executed voucher for your next
quarterly payment please favor me by returning this circular to him with
replies to the questions enumerated below.
Very respectfully, Commissioner of Pensions.

First. Are you married? If so, please state your wife's full name and her
maiden name.
Answer. Yes, Sophie Hale Fisher, Sophie Hale Camp.
Second. When, where and by whom were you married?
Answer. Feb 21, 1868, Sackets Harbor, New York, Rev. Cheeseman.
Third. What record of marriage exists?
Answer. Marriage Certificate.
Fourth. Were you previously married? If so, please state the name of your
former wife and the date and place of her death or divorce.
Answer. No.
Fifth. Have you any children living? If so, please state their names and the
dates of their birth.
Answer. Emma C. May 28, 1869, Chas. D. Jany 27, 1871. Allen B. Feb 6, 1873,
Marjorie M. June 1, 1874, Dorothy, May 25, 1877, Geo. C. Oct. 10, 1879, Roswell
F. Oct. 7 1882. Donald Oct 13, 1887, Tully M. Mch 26, 1892.
Charles W. Fisher (signed)
Date of reply, July 4th, 1898."


8. "Department of the Interior, Bureau of Pensions. Washington, D.C. January
2, 1915. Sir: Please answer, a your earliest convenience, the questions
enumerated below. The information is requested for future use, and it may be of
great value to your widow or children. Use the inclosed envelope, which requires
no stamp. Very respectfully, Commissioner."

No. 1. Date and place of birth? Answer. February 22, 1841, Schenectady, NY.
The name of organizations in which you served? Answer. Co. I 104 NY Vol.
Infy. No other service [!?].
No. 2 What was your post office at enlistment? Anser. Schenectady, NY.
No. 3. State your wife's full name and her maiden name. Answer. Sophie Camp
Fisher, Sophie Camp Hale.
No. 4. When, where and by whom were you married? Answer. February 21, 1868,
Sackett's Harbor, New York. Rev. Anson Cheeseman.
No. 5. Is there any official or church record of your marriage? Answer. Don't
know.
If so, where? Answer. Watertown, Jefferson Co., New York (if any)
No. 6. Were you previously married? Answer. No.
No. 7. If your present wife was married before? Answer. No.
No. 8. Are you now living with your wife, or has there been a separation?
Answer. No - deceased.
No. 9. State the names and dates of birth of all your children, living or dead.
Answer. No children under sixteen.

Date: May 7th, 1915. Signature: Charles W. Fisher"


9. "Volunteer Service (Civil War or War with Spain.) WAR DEPARTMENT, The
Adjutant General's Office. Respectfully returned to the Commissioner of
Pensions. Charles W. Fisher. Co. I 104 Reg't NY Inf. age 21 [presumably at
time of enlistment]. Was enrolled Jany 9, 1862 and discharged on account of
physical disability and for absence without leave in SO 234 War Dept, dated July
16, 1864. From M.E. to discharge he held the rank of 2 Lieut. & Capt.
Considered commissioned 2 Lieut. to date Feby 1862, M.I. [mustered in] as Capt.
to date Sep. 17, 1862 and the rolls on file for that period do not show him
absent except as follows: Aug 31 to Oct 31, 1862. Taken prisoner in the battle
of Aug. 30. Aug 31, 1862, absent wounded, since July 1, 1862 - Oct. 31, 1862.
Without leave since Oct. 15, 1862, June 30 absent without leave since May 5,
1864.
It has been ascertained by this Department that the charges of absence without
leave are erroneous and that he was absent sick on and from Jly 4 to Nov. 21,
1863, and on and from May 5, to 24, 1864.
Prisoner of War records show him paroled in Prince Wm Co. on Sept. 4, 1862 to
report at Richmond, Va., capture was shown, confined at Richmond, Va. date not
shown. Delivered on Parole at Aikens Bay Va. Sept. 24, 1862, reported at Camp
Parola, Md Oct. 19-20, 1862 and sent to Aquina Creek, Va. Decem. 14, 1862.
The age of Charles W. Fisher co. G, 42 US Inf is shown by the records of this
office as 24 years."

10. "Adjutant General's Office, Washington, DC, August 27th, 1870. Sir: I have
the honor to acknowledge the receipt from your Office of application for Pension
No. 157 960 and to return it herewith, with such information as is furnished by
the files of this Office.
It appears from the records of this Office that Charles W. Fisher was
enlisted at Buffalo, NY from Jan. 2, 1867 for the period of three years. On
the Muster Roll of Co. G, 42 Regiment of US Infty for the months of March
and April, 1869, he is reported Private Discharged, March 30, 1869 at
Madison Baks, N. York on Surgeons Certificate of disability.
I am, sir, very respectfully, Your obedient servant, Assistant Adjutant
General.
The Commissioner."


[CONTINUED IN Charles Wiley FISHER ++++]

Notes from Tom Russell received 6 Jan 1995 (see under his name, Thomas Joseph
RUSSELL):

"Buried in Oakland Cemetery. Arrangements made by his son Allen. Location in
cemetery - block 46 lot 91 sight E. Plot located, as of 31 May 1994, between
Jenks and Case off Jackson directly in line with the alley across Jackson Street
from the Cemetery grounds.

Civil War Captain in Company I, 104 NY Volunteer Infantry.

Was elected and mustered in as Captain Company E, Morgan Guards. Reduced to 1st
Lieutenant by consolidation with Company B on 6 Mar 1862. Company E and B were
now formed to make up Company I.

Fought and captured at Manassas 30 Aug 1862.

Discharged 24 May 1864 at Washington D.C., per Special Order #234 dated due to a
wound and absence without leave [later determined erroneous, see under Charles
Wiley FISHER +++].

Entered military service 9 Jan 1862 as a 2nd Lieutenant, promoted to 1st
Lieutenant 9 Jan 1862. Reduced in rank to 2nd Lieutenant on 6 Mar 1862.

Missing in Action at Bull Run 30 Aug 1862.

Promoted to Captain on 17 Sep 1862.

Brother of Charles Wiley was Leander, supposedly a composer whose song, "A
Robin's Return" provided royalty funds to his family for years.

Wounded by gun shot in the left thigh at Gettysburg, PA on 1 Jul 1863. Sent to
Douglas Hospital.

All military information per U.S. National Archives Records received Jul 1994.
No Pension Records available [but we have some].

Information regarding Leander Fisher provided by Kathleen Fisher Schorr in
1994."

Tom Russell also sent the following:

" CAPTAIN CHARLES WILEY FISHER
AN ACCOUNT OF HIS CAPTURE AND IMPRISONMENT IN LIBBY PRISON
Transcribed from his hand written account, by his great grandson
Thomas J. Russell

Commander,

My experience as a prisoner of war was more of a nature of a picnic when
compared with the experiences of quite all of my comrades. Its duration was
brief and the only interesting feature, out of the ordinary connected with it,
was the manner in which was made, the greater part of the journey from near the
place of capture to Richmond, VA.

On the retreat from the second battle of Bull Run, Saturday August 30th, 1862, I
was disabled and captured and arrived under guard near the field during the
night. At day break the following day, passed over the portions of the ground
in which we had been engaged. This being my only view of the field of battle
directly after our engagement, I was deeply impressed with the grim horror of
war, a lasting impression. Was taken to Gainesville, about six miles from place
of capture, into the front yard of a farm house 6th of September. As the yard
in which we were confined was on the main highway and the Confederate troops
constantly passing during the day, we saw the greater part of their army. The
guards would point out and name the general officers. The rations furnished us
during this time consisted of fresh meat, corn meal and flour. We had the use
of camp kettles and prepared the food by boiling the meat and making dumplings
of the flour. The enlisted men captured were paroled. We were informed that we
would not be so favored, that they were awaiting a home guard sent for, to
escort us to Richmond. I have always thought that the home guard part of it was
a misstatement as they did not want to weaken their force by a sufficient guard,
they being on their way to the invasion of Maryland. Knowing our fate was
Richmond and growing tired of waiting, it was decided by a majority to adopt a
proposition which had been made that we would give up parole to report to
Richmond as prisoners of war which we gave to an officer of the staff of Gen'l
A. P. Hill detailed for the purpose. I have never heard of a like occurence as
this during the war. Undoubtedly it was the only one in which a body of
officers or men gave a like paroling to report at a stated place as prisoners of
war. On the morning of the 7th we started on our journey with Capt. Randolph
Qtr. Mstr. C.S.A. as guide. (The captain was a perfect gentleman and in every
way treated us as such.) An army wagon was furnished to convey those that were
diabled and those that may fall by the wayside. We were not compelled to march
as a body. The stopping place for th night was decided on and as we arrived we
reported to Capt. Randolph who went in advance, mounted, and such undoubtedly
notified the detachments of their troops going to the front of our coming as we
meet a number of such and were no way molested. They were loud in their claims
of marching through Maryland and Pennsylvania, captureing Baltimore, Washington
and Philadelphia and ending the war and taking in consideration the disastrous
campaign of Gen McClellan in the Peninsula and Gen Popes utter failure, ending
in the disgraceful route [sic] of his Army at 2nd Bull Run, its [sic] no wonder
that they were so elated and we consequently depressed. Its amusing at this
date to recall the curses made against officers in high command by a number of
our body of prisoners, especially against Genl McDowell, who in the campaign
wore a light colored coat and hat. He was charged with being a traitor and
wearing this hat as a mark by which he would be known by the enemy. Gen Pope by
his braggardness orders [sic], and failure to sustain them, was very unpopular.

Our stopping place for the first night was Warrenton, the second, Culpepper
Courthouse. We entered the hotels in each of these cities, registered, giving
name, rank, regiment and state as if we were doing the like in any hotel at the
north, and were accommodated with food and lodging as far as their capacity
would go. At Culpepper I called upon Adjutant Vance of my regiment who had been
left in hospital at this place in Gen Popes retreat after the battle of Cedar
Mountain. He had been paroled and removed to a private house and was very kindly
cared for.

Orange Court House was given out as the meeting place for the evening of the
9th. It had been the custom for a number of us to make the days journey in the
early morning and late afternoon to avoid the heat of mid-day, and this morning
of the 9th three of us started quite early. We followed the railroad track.
The bridges over the runs being burned, we crossed at fords. The water in the
streams being very low we had no difficulty. Nearing Cedar Run, we saw the hand
cars filled with people approaching in the opposite side. They descended and
reached the ford at the same time was we. We waited until they crossed their
cars being carried over. One of this party was the President of the so called
Confederate States, Jefferson Davis. His Secretary of War and other officers
were of the number. We learned by the Richmond papers that they were enroute to
the Headquarters of Gen Lee, but on his arrival at Culpepper finding that the
communications with the army was not open, he did not venture beyond that point
for fear of capture. On the arrival of entire party at Orange Court House,
instead of remaining over night, we were ordered to load flat cars in waiting,
taken to Gordonsville where we were placed under guard by the Provost Marshall
[sic] of that place and confined in an old carriage house. Orders having been
received and no doubt given by Mr. Davis, not to recognize our parole. On the
next morning, the 10th, we then proceeded under guard to Richmond and marched to
Libby Prison. Except for the vermin that infested this famous place, we had
nothing in particular to complain of during our stay of fourteen days. There
was the usual daily rumors about us that those who had served under Gen Pope
would be retained in prison and tried for horse stealing and other depredations.
What seemed to confim this was that a number who had served under Gen.
McClellan, and were in Libby on our arrival, were paroled a few days after. The
rations furnished us daily was a loaf of bread and soup at mid-day. We could
purchase things through the sutler of the prison, vegetables and other eatables.
The colored porters who sweep out, would smuggle in the daily papers. We all
had a supply of money.

There were one hundred and twenty of us, eighty in our party and forty who had
been captured at Cedar Mountain and minor engagements prior to Bull Run. Among
those captured at Cedar Mountain was Maj. G. B. Halstead of our insurrection
[?].

We received the news of the battle of Antietam fought on Wednesday the 17th. On
the following Sunday the 21st, and on the following Wednesday the 24th, we were
all paroled. Left Richmond early on the morning of the 25th by carriage and
wagons, each of us paying five dollars for the ride to City Point ten miles
distant, where the flag of a truce boat was in waiting. Boarded the boat,
steamed down the James River to Fortress Monroe. Remained several hours at this
place. Again took boat, our destination being Annapolis, MD. Had a fine ride
down the Chesapeake Bay arriving at Annapolis early the next morning. We
reported to the Provost Marhsall of Annapolis and on the next day each of us
received a leave of absence for thirty days with permission to visit Washington.
At the expiration of my leave I reported to the Commanding Officer of the Parole
Camp at Annapolis and was placed in charge of a company of one hundred men. The
duty required in this capacity was to inspect the company each morning at ten
o'clock and to sign requisitions for rations and clothing for them. A duty
which required about two hours each day, the balance of which was spent in the
city. Received notice of my exchange on Dec 13th and immediately rejoined my
regiment in camp near Belle Plain, VA.

I was wounded at Gettysburgh [sic] on Wednesday July 1st, 1863. The division
hospital of the 2nd Div 1st A.C. [Army Corps] to which my regiment was attached,
was in the Lutheran church in the city of Gettysburgh, and as the enemy had
possition of the city until the morning of their retreat on the 4th, I again
lost a second [?] and wa again in their hands. But fortunately for me not able
to be taken south, as were my 1st Lieut. John Daily and 2nd Lieut. James Cain
and a number of other officers of my regiment.

End"


[CONTINUED IN Charles Wiley FISHER +++++]

Concerning a fragment of the 1st day at the Battle of Gettysburg, 1 Jul 1863:
"Reinforced by Ramseur's Brigade the Confederates renewed the contest at this
point [after Baxter's Brigade, assisted by Cutler's Brigade, had repulsed an
attack by O'Neal's Alabama and Iverson's North Carolina Brigades), whereupon
Robinson ordered up his only reserve, that of Paul's Brigade, relieving a part
of Baxter's regiments and supporting the others. In Paul's Brigade were the
Ninety-fourth New York, Colonel Adrian R. Root, and the One hundred and fourth
New York, Col. Gilbert G. Prey. The latter regiment distinguished itself in a
charge made by its three left companies on a stone wall, from which they
dislodged the enemy, capturing sixty prisoners or more. Lieut. Thomas Johnson,
of the One hundred and fourth, was mortally wounded. General Paul was seriously
wounded, losing both eyes. Colonel Root succeeded to the command of the
brigade, holding it until wounded himself."
-- William F Fox, Lt Col, 107th NY Vols, "New York at Gettysburg", New York
Monuments Commission for the Battlefields of Gettysburg and Chattanooga
*Final Report of the Battlefield of Gettysburg*, Albany NY (J B Lyon CO),
1902, v 1, p 17. On p. 108, figures are given for 104th Infantry (First
Corps): Present: 309; Killed: 11; Wounded: 91. Captured or missing: 92.
The numbers for all New York troops given are: Present: 27,692; Killed: 989;
Wounded: 4,023; Captured or missing: 1,761. The 104th is listed on p 124-125
as having been part of the Army of the Potomac, First Army Corps, commanded
by Maj Gen John F Reynolds (killed the 1st day), Maj. Gen. Abner Doubleday
(commanded the rest of the 1st day), and Maj. Gen. John Newton (2nd and 3rd
days). Further, it was part of the First Brigade of the Second Division of
the First Army Corps, commanded successibely by Brig. Gen. Gabriel Paul
(wounded), Col. Samuel H Leonard (wounded), Col. Adrian R. Root (wounded,
Col. Richard Coulter (wounded), and Col. Peter Lyle. The 104th regiment
itself is listed as under the command of Col. Gilbert G. Prey. On p 140, the
casualties for the 104th are broken down into: Killed: 0 officers, 11
enlisted men; Wounded: 10 officers, 81 enlisted men; Captured or Missing: 10
officers, 82 enlisted men. The actions of the 104th on the 2nd and 3rd days
of the battle are not mentioned in this article, but see below..

In this same work, the list of those of the 104th killed or mortally wounded at
Gettysburg is given on v 1, p 224 as follows. NOTE: The Charles FISHER,
private, of Co. I is presumably not my grandfather Charles Wiley FISHER, who is
certified in various army and pension records to have been in Co. I with rank of
captain at Gettysburg, and to have survived (though wounded and briefly
captured):

Co. Co.
Abbey, Henry L Private C Lewis, Samuel S Private
D
Barnes, Edwin C Private C Lodwick, John Private B
Buckingham, Maurice Sergeant C Lohrnes, Atwater Private K
Burgess, Horace Private D Mix, Alonzo F Private B
Curtis, Thomas J Sergeant A O'Keefe, Owen Sergeant H
Davis, William L Private A Pecktil, Alonzo M Private
K
Fisher, Charles Private I Pennock, Nelson Private
E
Fuller, Peter F Private B Perry, Orville O Private
G
Galusha, Reuben C Private K Roberts, John E Sergeant G
Giles, James Private I Runyan, John Private D
Harrington, Truman Private B Shea, William H Sergeant I
Hill, John Private F Tighe, James Private
H
Husson, William Private F Veazey, Warner Private C
Johnston, Thomas Lieut. D Wells, John P Private E
Lifflith, Jose Sergeant D Woodruff, William Private
A
Lewis, Stephen W Private B

From same, except vol 2, p 750-754:

"DEDICATION OF MONUMENT [at Gettysburg]
104th REGIMENT INFANTRY "WADSWORTH GUARDS"
September 4, 1888
ORATION BY COL. JOHN R. STRANG

COMRADES AND FRIENDS:
We stand to-day upon one of the great and historic battlefields of the world.
..... It is no small thing, my comrades, ... to know we had a part, not small
nor unconsequential, in the deeds which were done here. True, we [the First
Army Corps] did not win the fight; but none the less it is true that the
desperate valor and heroic tenacity of the First Corps upon this ground, made
it possible for the remainder of the Army of the Potomac to reach that
position upon Cemetery Hill which the keen eye and soldierly instinct of
Hancock selected for the field of battle, where the fight was fought and won.
Were it not for the First Corps the name of Gettysburg itself would be
unknown in the annals of the war, excepting as the location of a skirmish
between the Union cavalry and Lee's advancing forces. .....
The One hundred and fourth Regiment of New York Infantry, whose monument we
dedicate to-day, was a part of the First Brigade, Second Division, First Army
Corps. ..... Veterans they had been made on the fields of Manassas,
Antietam, Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville; inured to the hardships of the
march and camp, and the exposure of the picket line, on this field they
illustrated the patriotism which possessed them, and with a devotion to their
country and the cause for which they fought, clung to this hill until support
to the right and left of them was gone, and then slowly retired, fighting as
they went.
The regiment had become reduced in numbers, so that only about 330 officers
and men were in line when the battle began; and of that number nearly two-
thirds did not return with the corps over Cemetery Hill that night, but are
accounted for by the figures upon this monument,--- 11 killed, 91 wounded, 92
captured and missing. These figures are taken from the official report made
at that time, to which we are confined by the rules of the Commission, and
before it was possible to ascertain the fate of many who were reported
wounded or missing, as we had no access to this portion of the battlefield,
nor to the hospitals in the town until the 5th day of July. The actual loss
of the regiment, as finally ascertained, and including the casualties of the
second and third days' battles, was: Killed in action or died fo wounds, 25;
other wounded officers, 8; enlisted men, 73; captured or missing, and not
otherwise accounted for, 93; making a total of 199.
Of the killed and wounded 7 belonged to the color guard, which consisted of 8
men, one only escaping unhurt. Color Sergt. Maurice Buckingham of Company C,
was shot dead early in the engagement, and Color Sergt. William H. Shea of
Company I was mortally wounded. The State flag presented to the regiment by
Mrs. General Wadsworth, was borne in safety from the field by Sergt. David E.
Curtis of Company D, notwithstanding he was slightly wounded; and he
afterwards carried it, until severely wounded, at Spotsylvania. The United
States colors were passed from one to another as the bearers were
successively killed or wounded, until they came into the hands of Sergt.
Moses Wallace of Company E, by whom they were torn from the staff and
destroyed to prevent capture by the enemy. Lieut. Thomas Johnston of Company
D, was the only officer killed, and while it is impractible to give the names
of all those who were killed or severely wounded, I may mention in the latter
class the names of Lieut. Col. H. G. Tuthill, Capt. H. A. Wiley, and Lieut.
James W. Dow, without invidious distinction.
It would be impossible for me to give, after so long a time, a clear and
detailed statement of the movements of the regiment during the whole of the
battle, for on the second and third days the corps was used in fragments by
brigades and divisions, here and there, as the pressing need for
reinforcements seemed to require. On the evening of the second day our
division had a part in recovering the line, and saving the artillery near the
"Peach Orchard," where General Sickles' desperate engagement had taken place
just before. On the third day we were just in rear of Cemetery Hill during
the furious cannonade, whixh none of us who were there will ever forget, and
at its close were rapidly moved to the right, and then across Cemetery Hill
to the left, arriving there just in time to see Pettigrew's Rebel Division,
which was to have supported Pickett, broken and put to flight by our
artillery fire, and to witness as silent but anxious spectator's a part of
the splendid charge of Pickett's Division, and its crushing repulse by the
Second Corps.
But my memory of the first day's scenes is tolerably clear, and having
refreshed it by the recollection of others, among whom I may mention Colonel
Prey and Captain Starr, it has seemed to me appropriate to recount those
scenes more fully here. We had bivouacked, for a day or two before the
battle, in the vicinity of Emmitsburg, Md., leaving there in the early
morning of July 1st, under the command of Gen. John F. Reynolds, with orders
to proceed to Gettysburg. Before reaching the town, General Reynolds learned
that Buford's Cavalry was already engaged with Rebel infantry and needed
support. So we were pushed on as rapidly as possible, our brigade having the
rear of the corps that day, and coming in sight of Seminary Ridge about 11
o'clock in the fiorenoon, we learned that General Reynolds had been killed.
Wadsworth's and Doubleday's Divisions were already all engaged, and our
division, under General Robinson, was placed in reserve near the Seminary
building, being employed for a part of the time until afternoon in the
construction of temporary breastworks from rails and other movable materials,
a little to the west of the building.
The rapid and continuous advance of the Rebel force under Gen. A. P. Hill,
from the west, and General Ewell, from the north, soon made it necessay to
extend our line of battle to the north in order to cover the Mummasburg Road,
along which Ewell's forces, if unopposed, would gain the right and rear of
the First Corps, and cut it off from the town. About 1 o'clock the Second
Brigade of our division, under General Baxter, was thus used to prolong the
line of battle to the right, along the ridge and to the west of it, finding
the Rebel troops already nearing, and in position to prevent their further
advance along the road. At about the same time the Eleventh Corps began to
arrive along the road. At about the same time the Eleventh Corps began to
arrive upon the field, and leaving a division upon Cemetery Hill as a
reserve, two of its divisions were pushed out on the north of the town to
oppose the expected advance of Ewell's Corps from the direction. This
disposition left a long space between the right of the First Corps and the
left of the Eleventh, and right through the middle of that space ran this
Mummasburg Road, by which Rodes' Division of Ewell's Corps was seeking to
reach the town. Iverson's Rebel Brigade had the advance down the road, but
was handsomely repulsed by Baxter's Brigade, aided by Cutler's Brigade of
Wadsworth's Division, a large part of Iverson's men being killed, wounded or
captured. The check was, however, only temporary, and reinforced by the
brigades of Daniel and O'Neal the Rebels again advanced, and partly seized
the stone wall running along the ridge, southerly from the road.
To repel their attack and hold the line at this point, the First Brigade
under General Paul, which was the sole remaining reserve of the First Corps,
was double-quicked to the right, and ordered to take position to the right of
Baxter's Brigade, facing partly to the west and partly to the north. The
Thirteenth Massachusetts was on the right of the brigade, with out regiment
next to it. Coming rapidly into line we encountered a destructive fire from
the Rebel forces sheltered in the grove and behind the stone wall, and a
considerable part of our loss in killed and wounded was sustained while we
were in this position. Finally, under the personal lead of Colonel Prey, we
charged over the stone wall, dislodging and driving back the Rebel forces in
confusion, quite a number of prisoners were taken by the companies of our
regiment under command of Captains Wiley and Dixon. It was now nearly 3
o'clock, and the whole plain to the north and west of the town seemed to be
filled with the advancing Rebel forces. The angle between the First and
Eleventh Corps was once more made the scene of a determined attack, but
without success, the Rebels being driven back. We followed them for a short
distance beyond the wall, retiring immediately, however, to our former
position, in view of their overpowering numbers, and keeping up a constant
and well-directed musketry fire upon such of them as were within reach. The
brunt of this attack fell mainly upon our brigade; but we were aided in
repulsing it by the enfilading fire from two fo the regiments of Baxter's
Brigade.
Prior to this time General Paul had been severely wounded, losing the sight
of both eyes. The two senior colonels were successively wounded, and the
brigade had been practically without any commander for some time, until at
this point Colonel Prey took command, by order of General Robinson, and
retained it until the close of the first day's engagement.
An open space of 300 yards or more still remained between the right of the
First Corps and the left of the Eleventh, perceiving which, part of Rodes'
Division was massed for attack under shelter of the McLean buildings and
shrubbery, north of the Mummasburg Road. We had no reserve left to fill this
gap, and I was now directed by Colonel Prey to find the nearest brigade or
division commander of the Eleventh Corps, and represent to him the position
of affairs, and the danger which was apparent, that the neemy thus massing at
McLean's would penetrate our lines through this opening, which if done in
sufficient force would immediately render the position of both corps
untenable. I was unable to find either of those commanders, but delivered my
message to a staff officer, and the commanding officer of the nearest
Eleventh Corps troops and then returned to the regiment. Before reaching it,
on looking bck, I saw that the right of the Eleventh Corps was rapidly being
driven back, and its brigade nearest us was changing front to the right in
order to protect its flank and line of retreat, instead of coming to our aid.
The anticipated advance upon our right immediately took place, and being left
without any protection on that flank, we were subjected to a murderous
enfilading fire, and obliged to fall back and change front to the right in
order to protect our rear. The Rebel advance from the west was also renewed
with resistless numbers, Gen. A. P. Hill's Corps, from that direction, while
two divisions of Ewell's Corps assailed us from the north. We were slowly
driven back to the town and through its streets, and having been at the
extreme right of the corps, a good many of our men were cut off and captured
before they could reach the town.
Arriving at the rear of Cemetery Hill about 6 o'clock, we gathered together
what remained of our regiment and found that we numbered 3 officers and 43
men. Of course, in the confusion of the retreat a good many men had become
separated from their commands. Others who had been cut off and captured in
the streets, or in the hospitals where they had gone with wounded friends,
made their escape and rejoined us, so that on the morning of the second day,
our numbers had increased to about 100, officers and men. According to
General Robinson's report the total loss of our division in the first day's
fight was 1,660 out of about 2,500 engaged, or two-thirds of the whole
command.
Comrades, I have thus given you in a brief, and perhaps somewhat imperfect
way, the record of our regiment on that eventful day. I am proud of it, and
so is each one of you. We did our duty and we did it well. Many of our best
and bravest officers and men went down to death that day, giving their young
lives for their country and the flag they loved so well; many more received
grievous wounds from which they are yet suffering; others, by the fortune of
war, were prisoners in the hands of the enemy, and after days of alternate
hope and gfear, as they were held almost in sight of the battlefield, were at
last hurried along across the Potomac and into the horrible prison pens at
Richmond, Salisbury, and Andersonville, where starvation and disease were
more deadly than th storm of iron upon the battlefield, and where even death
was welcomed as a benefactor. ..... "


From same (vol. 2), p 755-758:

"THE 104TH NEW YORK AT GETTYSBURG
BY COL. GILBERT G. PREY

The 30th of June, 1863, found our corps near Emmitsburg, Md. Wadsworth's
Division was within five miles of Gettysburg; Robinson's, with which was the
One hundred and fourth, bivouacked that night at Emmitsburg. On the morning
of July 1st, orders came to move. General Wadsworth's Division had the lead
in the march. General Doubleday's followed, with General Robinson's in the
rear. Out march was north, towards Gettysburg, on the Emmitsburg Pike. A
mile from Gettysburg we obliqued to the left, crossing the field towards the
Seminary and striking Seminary Ridge near the Hagerstown Road, taking
position on the north side of the grove and on the west slope of the ridge.
Here we were first under fire at Gettysburg. Soon we were moved farther
north towards the railroad track, with order to keep our guns unloaded. The
day had become quite showery. At the place Colonel Root of the NInety-fourth
was wounded by an exploding shell. From this point we moved still farther
north. In this movement our brigade became so mixed with Baxter's that when
we were across the railroad the Thirtennth Massachusetts Regiment was in line
fronting the Mummasburg Road on the east slope of Seminary Ridge, the One
hundred and fourth on the left of the Thirteenth, obliquing across the ridge
westerly to a stone wall. This wall made an acute angle with the road,
leaving a very obtuse angle in the battle lijnes. To our left on and along
the ridge southerly was the Ninety-Seventh New York of Baxter's Brigade.
Joining the Ninety-seventh was the One hindred and seventh Pennsulvania, then
the Sixteenth Maine, and the NInety-fourth New York. The NInety-fourth and
the Ninety-seventh had exchanged brigades.


[CONTINUED IN Charles Wiley FISHER ++++++]

From *New York at Gettysburg* (1902, v 2, p 755-758), continued from FISHER,
Charles Wiley +++++:


"While the brigade was awaiting orders and the regiments were taking position I
received an order from General Robinson in person to form on the right of the
Thirteenth Massachusetts. I moved to form on the right, and so moved obliquely
to the line of the Thirteenth, when there came from the crest of the ridge a
stentorian voice: "Colonel Prey, -- -- you, where are you going? Form on the
left." I glanced to the rear and saw at once that I was just in position so
that by flanking to the left I would form on the left of the Thirteenth as
nicely as if on brigade drill. Remembering that the guns were unloaded, and
knowing that we would be engaged immediately, I gave the command to "March!
Load at will!" The One hundred and fourth formed on the left of the Thirteenth
on that occasion in as good style as General Robinson ever formed a regiment,
or that he ever manoeuvered in a brigade drill. Not until this time did
General Paul appear on the field, and while riding up in the rear of the One
hundred and fourth was shot through the face, destroying one eye and coming out
under the other, but not injuring it. My horse was hit at the same time,
obliging me to dismount, which General Robinson said he very much regretted as
he wanted all his regimental commanders mounter; yet, I remember seeing all of
the regimental commanders unmounted during that fight.
The brigade was getting demoralized by having no brigade commander. I saw
General Robinson near where he had given me his forcible command, and asked
who was in command of the brigade, as General Paul had been taken from the
field wounded. He said, "Where is Colonel Root?" "Don't know; not here."
"Where is Colonel Leonard?" "Not with his regiment." "You are next in rank,
take command of the brigade!"
The firing was tremendous from the angle of the road and the stone wall.
Seven color bearers had already been shor down. Upon coming up from the
right and reaching thje angle I saw that in a few minutes we would have no
men left, and gave the command to th eleft wing of the regiment to charge on
the wall or they would all soon be dead men. Do you remember it, comrades?
Do you remember that you hesitated? That was the only time I ever knew the
One hundred and fourth to hesitate. I stepped in front and said, "I'll lead
you, boys." You followed. The wall was taken and you were safe. I went back
to the right wing; we made a similar charge on the Mummasburg Road, and not
only took our position but captured over 60 prisoners, which we sent to the
rear. Lieutenant Colonel Batchelder of the Thirteenth Massachusetts took them
from oour detail as they passed his regiment and reported them captured by
the Thirteenth.
Upon passing up to the crest of the ridge I saw a column of Confederates
passing into the McLean timber, and calculated they would be too many for us,
as we had thus far three to one against us. I reported the fact to General
Robinson, and that we would need reinforcement to hold our position. The
Sixteenth Maine was sent to the angle, and while it was moving the order came
to fall back to the timber, near the railroad leading to Chambersburg. We
fell back, forming in good shape except the One hundred and seventh
Pennsylvania, which was in command of its lieutenant colonel. We next
received an order to fall back further, as the portion of the Eleventh Corps,
north of Gettusburg, was running like scared sheep. We were obliged to fall
back across the valley and just got through the lower part of the town "bu
the skin of our teeth," running the gauntlet through a stowm of bullets. If
General Howard had been on the plain with his men, and not allowed the
Confederate troops to get in the rear of the First Corps, who were doing so
splendidly, he would have been batter business than where he was on the
ridge.
Let me tell you something. No man could then or can now, with any glass,
stand on Cemetery Hill and see even the ground over which the First Corps
fought that day, except one brigade on the extreme right. A strip of timber
along the ridge from the Mummasburg Road to a point opposite the Round Tops
hid the manoeuvring of Lee's forces. Besides, there were clumps of timber
here and there along the whole ridge. General Howard told you over at Silver
Lake that he comanded the First Corps while on Cemetery Hill with his glass,
after General Reynolds was killed. As I remember, General Doubleday did. He
told you that he it was who established the ground for fighting Lee's forces
at Gettysburg. History says General Hancock did, being sent out for that
purpose by general Meade.
If I hadn't been in the strife at Gettysburg I would have gone out from that
lecture with the idea that General Howard fought the whole battle. Because a
general outranks others, it's no reason he should assume to have done all the
work. General Butterfield, at the meeting of G. A. R. Posts of Livingston
and Allegany, at Nunda, said that the private soldier did some of the work of
putting down the Rebellion. He is the only general officer I ever heard talk
who gave any credit to the men in the ranks. A little word is too often
omitted after a general's name; it is "men," and the general's name should be
followed by an apostrophe and an "s." Had there been none to do the fighting
but those who wore shoulder straps, there would have been small chance of
putting down the rebellion.
General Wadsworth's Division after the first day was in position east of
Cemetery Hill, between the Eleventh and the Twelfth Corps, near Culp's Hill;
Doubleday's, on the left of the Second Corps, toward Round Top; Robinson's,
in Ziegler's Grove, south of the Cemetery, on the right of the Second Corps.
Coulter with his regiment from Baxter's Brigade to Paul's, and Colonel
Coulter, neing superior in rank, replaced me in command of the brigade. In a
few days he exchanged Colonel Coulter's regiment for the Ninetieth
Pennsylvania, and Colonel Lyle took command of the brigade. Don't such things
look a little like the shadow of Thoroughfare Gap?
At the close of the first day's fight the reported casualties in the One
hundred and fourth was just one-half of its morning strength. During the
second day we occupied a position along the Baltimore Pike on the east slope
of the hill until the battle commenced, when we were moved to Ziegler's
Grove. Near dark we and the Sixteenth Maine were moved up on the double-
quick to help the Second Corps save their cannon, where were between the
lines, with all the horses killed. They were hauled off by hand and all the
pieces saved. As we arrived the last Confederate cannon was fired on that
part of the field. It cut down two or three men of the Sixteenth Maine, and
struck ground some five or six feet from where I stood. We were soon marched
back to Ziegler's Grove. The One hundred and fourth was then moved to the
rear of the batteries, and bivouacked for the night.
When the battle opened on the afternoon of the third day we were moved to the
stone wall in front of the batteries and near the Emmitsburg Pike. We were in
front of Pettigrew's Division, which moved with General Pickett on his famous
charge.
The only casualty I am able to name on the third day was the wounding of
Sergeant Gouber, of Company F, by a sharpshooter, when on his way to the
picket line.
The monument of the One hundred and fourth Regiment says "eleven killed." I
think it should say twenty-two. I understand the only casualties put on the
monuments were those sent in on the first hasty report, instead of the full
number for the three days' fighting. [Footnote by an editor: "The regimental
report of its casualties, or "nominal list," was made after the third day.
There were 11 killed and 18 mortally wounded in this regiment; but in
reporting its losses the latter were necessarily included with the wounded,
some of whom were probably killed. Had the corps retained possession of the
ground the return could have been more accurately classified.--Ed.]
We remained at the Grove on the 4th and 5th, while the dead were being
buried, and on the 6th followed the Confederates towards Williamsport, where
they were allowed to cross the Potomac."

[END QUOTE ROM *NEW YORK AT GETTYSBURG, v 2, 1902
********************************************************************** ****
**************


Excerpts concerning 104th NY Vol Inf at Gettysburg, from a book by J. M.
Vanderslice, *Gettysburg, Then and Now*, 1897 ((NY; originally published by the
Gettysburg Battle-field [sic] Memorial Association):

p 42: On first day, somewhat after 1 pm: "O'Neal's [Alabama] brigade was now
advancing against the right, when the 90th Pennsylvania was put in position
along the Mummasburg Road at right angles to the rest of the brigade, and Paul's
brigade of the division -- 13th Massachusetts, 104th New York, 16th Maine, 107th
Pennsylvania, and 94th New York Infantry -- moved to the support of Baxter's
[90th Pennsylvania, 12th Massachusetts, 88th Pennsylvania, 83rd New York, 97th
New York, and 11th Pennsylvania Infantry], extending and strengthening its line,
a portion of the line being nearly parallel with the Mummasburg Road and the
rest at right angles with it along the ridge. O'Neal's Alabama brigade -- 12th,
26th, 6th, and 5th Infantry -- attacked the right and was driven back in
confusion. Ramseur's North Carolina brigade -- 14th, 30th, 2d, and 4th Infantry
-- reinforcing Iverson's, repeatedly attacked the front, but without success."

p 209: With regard to memorials: 104th New York: Brigade: 1st, Paul:
Division: 2nd, Robinson; Corps, First; Killed and wounded: 102; Missing: 92.
There are numerous monuments to individual regiments mentioned, but none for the
104th is listed. However, the author apparently only mentions a selection of
the most striking. Perhaps the occurence of 104th NY in the table indicates
there is some monument to the 104th

[END EXCERPTS FROM VANDERSLICE]


"104th REGIMENT INFANTRY [NY VOLUNTEERS] ("WADSWORTH GUARDS," LIVINGSTON
COUNTY REGIMENT").

Organized at Geneseo, N.Y., October, 1861, to March, 1862. Left State for
Washington, D. C., March 22, 1862. Attached to Wadsworth's Command, Military
District of Washington, to May, 1862. 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, Dept. of
the Rappahannock, to June, 1862. 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, 3rd Corps,
Pope's Army of Virginia, to September, 1862. 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, 1st
Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to March, 1864. 1st Brigade, 3rd Division,
5th Army Corps, to August, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 3rd Division, 5th Army Corps,
to September, 1864. Provost Guard, 5th Army Corps, to May, 1865. 2nd
Brigade, 3rd Division, 5th Army Corps, to July, 1865.
SERVICE. -- Duty in the Defences of Washington, D. C., till May, 1862.
Expedition to Front Royal, Va., to intercept Jackson, May 28-June 1. Picket
duty on the Shenandoah and at Front Royal till June 10. Duty at Catlett's
Station, Warrenton and Waterloo, Va., till August. Battle of Cedar Creek
August 9. Pope's Campaign in Northern Virginia August 16-September 2. Fords
of the Rappahannock August 21-23. Thoroughfare Gap August 28. Groveton
August 29. Bull Run Seotember 6-22. Battles of South Mountain September 14;
Antietam September 16-17. Duty near Sharpsburg till October 30. Movement to
Falmouth, Va., October 12-15. At Falmouth and Belle Plains till April 27,
1863. "Mud March" January 20-24. Chancellorsville Campaign April 27-May 66.
Operations at Fitzhugh's Crossing April 29-May 2. Battle of Chancellorsville
May 2-5. Gettysburg (Pa.) Campaign June 11-July 24. Battle of Gettysburg,
Pa., July 1-3. Pursuit of Lee July 5-24. Duty on line of the Rappahannock and
Rapidan till October. Bristoe Campaign October 9-22. Advance to line of the
Rappahannock November 7-8. Mine Run Campaign November 26-December 2.
Demonstration on the Rapidan February 6-7, 1864. Campaign from the Rapidan
to the James May 3-June 15. Battles of the Wilderness May 5-7; Laurel Hill
May 8; Spottsylvania May 8-12; Spottsulvania Court House May 12-21. Assault
on the Salient May 12. North Anna River May 23-26. Jericho Ford May 23. On
line of the Pamunkey May 26-28. Totopotomoy May 28-31. Cold Harbor June
1-12. Bethesda Church June 1-3. White Oak Swamp June 13. Before Petersburg
June 16-18. Siege of Petersburg June 16, 1864, to April 3, 1865. Mine
Explosion, Petersburg, July 30, 1864 (Reserve). Weldon Railroad August 18-21.
Reconnoissance toward Dinwiddie Court House September 15. Warren's Raid on
Weldon Railroad December 7-12. Dabney's Mills, Hatcher's Run, February 5-7,
1865. Appomatox Campaign March 28-April 9. Lewis Farm, bear Gravelly Run,
March 29. White Oak Road March 31. Five Forks April 1. Fall of Petersburg
April 2. Pursuit of Lee April 3-9. Appomattox Court House April 9.
Surrender of Lee and his army. Moved to Washington, D. C., May 1-12. Grand
Review May 23. Duty at Washington till July. Mustered out July 17, 1865.
Regiment lost during service 5 Officers and 81 Enlisted men killed and
mortally wounded and 2 Officers and 145 Enlisted men by disease. Total 233."
Frederick H. Dyer, *A Compendium of the War of the Rebellion*, vol III
{"Regimental Histories") 1909 (Thomas Yoseloff, NY), reprint 1959 (Sagamore
Press, NY), p 1446.

From letter from Ellie Tritschler, professional genealogist, 186 Victoria
Blvd, Buffalo NY dated 17 June 1995:

"I did find in the Civil War records the citation for Charles W. It seemed
likely that the typed source I used mistyped when he was discharged, but
that's the way it appears in the original source enclosed. It seems he
really did serve only one day." The source in question is from *Report of
the Adjutant General* for 21st NY Infantry, formed in Buffalo NY, and reads:
"FISHER, CHARLES W. -- Enlisted, May 10, 1861, at Buffalo, to serve two
years, as private, Co. B; name appears on State pay-roll to May 11, 1861; no
further record." This suggests that either (1) my gf enlisted first from
Buffalo in the 21st NY Infantry, for one day in May 1961, and later enlisted
from Troy in the 104th NY in Oct 1961, as shown copiously in records above;
or (2) this was a different Charles W FISHER. If (1), could he have enlisted
for the bounty, and pulled out to enlist again, as some did? In support of
(2), consider the following from Ellie Tritschler's letter:

"I did find Charles and Jacob in the city directories [for Buffalo NY] as
follows:
1861 Charles W., firm of J & G F.H. home 180 Oak [different from address
given by Tritschler for Jacob & Charles about this time, see under Jacob].
The firm was a Flour and Hardware firm. No Jacob.
1862 Charles, lumber dealer, home 180 Oak. No Jacob.
1863 Jacob P. firm of George Urban flour dealer home 92 East Genesee corner
of Oak.
1865 Jacob is living at Church corner of Terrace, no occupation given
Charles W., flour dealer, boarding at Washington near High.

+++++++++++++++++++++

More from Ellie Tritschler in letter dated 6 July 1995:

"I really have had a run around trying to find Charles on the different
census[es]. The city directlry did not keep up with his address changes. His
entries as well as the other family members in the city directories were:
1861 Fisher, Charles W. firm of J&G Flour & Hardware boarding at the
Revere House
1862 lumber dealer, home 18 [180? see above]
Oak
1865 flour dealer, boarding at Washinton near
High
1866 firm Thayer & F, billiard hall boarding at
85 Franklin
1870 saloon, 46 Le Conteuix [sic: Contieux?];
Leander, musician, home 48 Oak
1875 not listed; Leander at 48 Oak
1880 not listed; Leander, music teacher, home
598 Ellicott
1890 saloon, home 150 Exchange.
The 1890 Census burned at the National Archives, only Civil War data
survived. I did all of the above addresses in the respective census[es] and
did not find him. As the Fisher family seemed to stay together, I then look
up Adrian and Dora Fisher Fellows and Leander.
1865 Fellows A.D. quartermaster Dept., 85 Franklin, no listing for Leander.
Note that Charles is listed as boarding at this address in 1866.
1866 A.W. Fellows clerk in canal collector's office home 18 Oak [or 180? see
above]
1870 Adrian residing at 48 Oak, no Leander listing
1875 Leander 598 Ellicott, no Charles, Adrian boarding at 816 Main
1881 No Adrian or Charles listing, Leander, 598 Ellicott
1890 Adrian boarding at 44 West Tupper, no Leander, but a Charles as listed
above. You seem to feel that your Charles was no longer in Buffalo by 1880.
I did check out the Charles W., stovemounter, he was not your Charles.
1898 only Adrian listed at 44 1/2 West Tupper.
If you want copies of any of the city directories entries please let me know.
(P) Whan I couldn't find Charles in the 1865 Census at Washington & High I
then checked the 1890 Census for Veterans of the civil War, hoping he had re-
enlisted or the historical society was wrong about his service. I did not
find Charles, Leander or Adrian Fellows having reported their servie to the
government representatives. (P) I then tried the last sensible ward for 1865
for Charles and found him! He and his sister, even on the original her name
is unreadable. I am enclosing 2 copies, 1 larger than the other. The census
for the family reads: AW Fellows, Dorah, Hattie, Sarah Fisher, Charles and
Seoneda? If the census taker had only dipped his pen before he came to your
family! On the smaller copy the last 4 boxes have to do with the military
and neither Adrian nor Charles are marked in the boxes. I copied a blank
page so you could easily read the headings. On the original the census taker
wrote in very faintly for Sarah, Rensselaer as the county of birth. ..... I
couldn't find Chales in the 1870 Census. Recently the public library ordered
an Index to the 1870 Census for Erie County so I didn't spend too long
looking for himas I know the index should arrive any day. (P) Next enclosure
is the 1875 Census and another sibling of Charles is on the census, Frank, a
magician! I checked the city directories for 1880, 1892. I did find a Frank
Fisher at 207 Mortimer, no occupation given. It's possible this is your Frank
but Mortimer Street was in the very German section of the city. Please let
me know if you want me to look for him on the 1880 Census."
continued under Sarah BARRINGER FISHER.
Note: The "Seoneda" (or whatever it is) in the 1865 census looks to
me like a sister of Adrian FELLOWS, not a sister of Charles FISHER,
and the Charles in that census entry looks like a brother of Adrian
FELLOWS and not the son Charles FISHER of Sarah FISHER. In other
words, the entry looks like it contains Sarah FISHER and her daughter
Dora FISHER FELLOWS, and some of their FELLOWS in-laws.
As to the "magician" Frank FISHER in the 1875 census, the entry looks
like "musician" except with a "g" instead of "s". This suggests maybe
we have "Frank" for "Leander". Note that we have here "Edwin" FELLOWS
instead of A.W. (or possibly A.D. -- in any case, Adrian) FELLOWS.
This doesn't speak well for the accuracy of the census taker. Maybe
FISHER wasn't even Frank's last name, but a clerical error (following
on Sarah FISHER).
On the whole, putting together the information sent by Ellie Tritschler
from Buffalo with our earlier information, it looks like there were at
least two, and maybe three, Charles W FISHERs around here during some of
these years. Ms. Tritschler says Charles W the stove-mounter is not
ours, and it looks like Charles W the flour and/or lumber dealer is not
ours, either.

"Lying among the Union wounded in one the town's [Gettysburg's] churches
at the end of the first day was William J. Starkes, a junior officer in
the 104th New York Volunteer Infantry. "About 8:00 o'clock P.M. the
[Confederate] Provost Marshal came in. He approached the group of cots
occupied by wounded officers and greeted us quite cheerily. 'Good
evening, gentlemen,' he said. 'I trust none of you are seriously hurt.
You have your own surgeons and men here, and they will not be disturbed.
We . . . soon began to ply him with questions. He was quite communicative.
Lee's army was . . . flushed with victory. The Union army was very much
demoralized. 'We shall walk over it tomorrow,' he said, and then he added
something about the time they expected to arrive in Philadelphia. Now,
the truth is I had always been rather an optimist in this matter of
preserving the Union, and, although things certainly did look rather
black, I somehow had no confidence in that trip to Philadelphia, and so I
replied to the Colonel, 'I say, Colonel, if there should happen to be be
any just cause or impediment which prevents that walk-over, would you mind
dropping in and telling us about it?' He laughed a little and said he
would."
Richard Wheeler, *Witness to Gettysburg*, The Blue and Grey Press, 1994, p
164. The reference to Starkes is not specified precisely.

church: Methodist Episcopal Church, Sackets Harbor in 1868


Sophia Hale Camp

DWS: from New England (Connecticut); Royals
by Gordon Fisher gfisher@shentel.net
on ancestry.com
Paternal grandmother of Gordon Fisher

Notes from Tom Russell received 6 Jan 1995, as to burial location: "location in [Oakland] cemetery = block 46 lot 91 grave F. See Charles Wiley Fisher notes for specific cemetery plot location reference landmarks."

Obituary from Minneapolis Tribune, Mar 6, 1915, p 13: "Mrs. Sophie C. Fisher of St. Paul was stricken Thursday afternoon with a hemorrhage of the brain while she was presiding as chairman of a meeting of the Soldiers Home Board of the Womens Relief Corps at the West Hotel. (P) She was taken to Asbury Hospital, but did not regain consciousness and died early yesterday. (P) Mrs. Fisher was a life member of the Corps. She was also Past Department President of the Minnesota Womens Relief Corps and had been for many years prominent in the work of the Corps throught the state. (P) Mrs. Fisher was born in Sacketts Harbor, NY., 67 years ago. She lived there for thirty years, and then came to St. Paul where she has since lived. Her home was at 1505 Grand Avenue. She leaves her husband, C. W. Fisher, five sons and three daughters. C. D. Fisher lives in Minneapolis, A.B., R.F., G.C., and T.J. Fisher live in St. Paul. The daughters are Mrs. Mcmasters, Hibbing, Minn., Mrs. E. Scott, and Mrs. E. M. Mortensen, St. Paul."

Obituary from St Paul Dispatch, Mar 8, 1915: "Honor Memory of Mrs. Sophie Fisher (P) Grand Army cirles of the state paid tribute today to the memory of Mrs. Sophie Camp Fisher, the Minnesota Woman's Relief corps leader, who died Friday, and whose funeral was held this afternoon from the House of Hope church. Services for the family were held from the home, 1505 Grand avenue, at 1:30 P.M. (P) At the House of Hope, following the rites conducted by Rev. H. C. Cyearingen, the women of Garfield Relief corps of which Mrs. Fisher was a member, took charge of the service under the direction of Mrs. Marie Soule, the corps president, and staff. (P) The pallbearers were William Mitsch, E. J. Sawyer, J. B. Morton, R. D. Dunwoody, A. M. Thompson and J. A. Boggs. Interment was in Oakland cemetery. (P) Among those present at the services were corps leaders from Minneapolis, Le Sueur, Duluth, Mankato and elsewhere, including Mrs. Lodusky J. Taylor, past national president, of Le Sueur, and Mrs. Anna Van Campen, department president of Cannon Falls. (P) Mrs. Fisher's husband, Major C. W. Fisher, is assistant inspector general in the department of Adjutant General Fred B. Wood, whose offices were closed today."

State of Minnesota death certificate lists cause of death as apoplexy.


Roswell "Ross" P Fisher

DWS: from New England (Connecticut); Royals
by Gordon Fisher gfisher@shentel.net
on ancestry.com
Paternal uncle of Gordon Fisher

"Roswell "Ross" Fisher -- b. June 1883, MN m. ?, d. bef. 1945."
Alison Melin (AOL: Alison 414; v. under Emma FISHER), from 1920 MN soundex

However, birthdate 7 Oct 1882 appears on a pension document of his father (see under Charles Wiley FISHER +++)

Also from Alison Melin, using also obits and city directories: "Roswell "Ross" Fisher -- In 1915, he was listed in obit as living in St. Paul. In 1920, no listing was found in the MN soundex. In 1924, he was listed in obit as living in Norfolk, VA. In 1944, he was not listed in Tully's obit. He did not appear in St. Paul city directories in 1946 or 1952."

Notes from Tom Russell, received 6 Jan 1995: "Disappeared"


Donald Gordon Fisher

DWS: from New England (Connecticut); Royals
by Gordon Fisher gfisher@shentel.net
on ancestry.com
Paternal uncle of Gordon Fisher

Notes from Tom Russell received 6 Jan 1995 say birthdate c 1889 deathdate c 1906.

However, pension document of his father says birthdate 13 Oct 1887 (see under Charles Wiley FISHER +++)

Obituary notice from St Paul Dispatch for Tuesday, July 31, 1906, received 20 May 1996 from Jenny Weber, 8308 W 30 1/2 St Apt 315, St Louis Park MN 55426-3543:

"DEATH DUE TO
EATING SALAD
-------
Donald G. Fisher, of Highwood, a
Victim of Attack of Asi-
atic Cholera.
-------
ATE DISH OF LOBSTER
-------
Illness Which Followed Terminated
in Death Within a Few
Hours.
-------
The sudden death of Donald G. Fisher,
son of Maj. C. W. Fisher and Mrs. So-
phia Camp Fisher, yesterday at High-
wood, removes a young man of unusual
interest and promise. Mr. Fisher was
attacked on Sunday evening with Asia-
tic cholera in violent form, brought on
by eating lobster salad, and died yester-
day morning. He was but 18 years of
age, and suffered a diminution of strength
during the past two years, owing to a
siege of typhoid fever and subsequent
relapses. But he was as active as the
most robust and had for some time been
employed as assistant in the office of the
auditor of passenger receipts of the
Great Northern.
Great love for books, music and all
the refinements of life distinguished the
youth. Mr. and Mrs. Fisher formerly
lived in Irvine Park.
The funeral will be held at the resi-
dence of Maj. Fisher at Highwood, to-
morrow at 2 o'clock, the train leaving
St. Paul at 1:20 and returning at 4:20.
The interment will be at Oakland."