Selected Schueth_Rice_Families and Individuals

Notes


Deacon Nathaniel Talcott

DWS: Wethersfield Inscriptions : a complete record of the inscriptions in the five burial places in the ancient town of Wethersfield, inluding the towns of Rocky Hill, Newington, and Beckley Quarter (in Berlin), also a portion of the inscriptions in the oldest cemetery in Glastonbury
by Edward Sweetser Tillotson 1899 pg 318
Glastonbury records:
"In Memory of Nath'll Talcot, Dec'n of ye Church of Christ in Glastenbury, Who Died January ye 30th A. D. 1758, Aged 80th year Wanting 9 Days."


Elizabeth

DWS: Wethersfield Inscriptions : a complete record of the inscriptions in the five burial places in the ancient town of Wethersfield, inluding the towns of Rocky Hill, Newington, and Beckley Quarter (in Berlin), also a portion of the inscriptions in the oldest cemetery in Glastonbury
by Edward Sweetser Tillotson 1899 pg 318
Glastonbury records:
"In Memory of Mrs. Elizabeth Talcott. Wife of Deacon Nathanal Talcott. who Died Aug'st ye 26th A. D. 1761, in ye 76th Year of her Age."


Keziah Williams

DWS: Wethersfield Inscriptions : a complete record of the inscriptions in the five burial places in the ancient town of Wethersfield, inluding the towns of Rocky Hill, Newington, and Beckley Quarter (in Berlin), also a portion of the inscriptions in the oldest cemetery in Glastonbury
by Edward Sweetser Tillotson 1899 pg 316
Glastonbury Records:


Mary Hollister

DWS: New England Families Genealogies and Biographies of Ancient Wethersfield
Henry R Stiles New York Grafton Press 1904 VOL II pg 432


Joseph Hollister

DWS: New England Families Genealogies and Biographies of Ancient Wethersfield
Henry R Stiles New York Grafton Press 1904 VOL II pg 432
DWS: which Joseph is this. Henry Stiles proposes this Joseph was the Joseph who died in his 50th yr in 1746 thus being born abt 1696. Joseph's daughters would of been born when he was only 8 years of age? Wrong Joseph. Probably Joseph was son of couple: Jonathan Hollister and Elizabeth Latimer or couple: John Hollister and Ann.


Henry Wolcott

New England Families Genealogies and Biographies of Ancient Wethersfield
Henry R Stiles New York Grafton Press 1904 Vol II pg 838-840
was one of the founders of Windsor, CT
**************
DWS: from A genealogical record composed of branches of the Wolcott, Hull, Wheeler, Barden, Bryan, Hart and Jones families in America St. Paul, Minn.: 1918 by Claude B Hart
"The Wolcotts trace their ancestry back (in England) to Sir Henry Wolcott, who (according to a legend written in the books of heraldry) while playing chess with King Henry the 5th, checkmated the king; with a rook, and thereafter the king placed the rooks upon the Wolcott arms to commemorate the event.
1. Henry Wolcott, born Dec. 1578, Tolland Somersetshire, Eng. Died May 10, 1655; buried at Windsor, Conn. Married Jan. 19, 1606, Elizabeth Saunders. Baptized Dec. 20, 1584. Died July 7, 1655.
He Came to 'New England on the ship " Mary and John." arriving May 30, 1630. They later settled in Windsor, Conn. One of his descendants was Roger Wolcott, Governor of Connecticut, whose son Oliver, became Governor of Connecticut. and was as signer of the Declaration of Independence. And his son, Oliver, Jr., was a member of Washington's Cabinet. and also Governor of Connecticut.
Thus father, son and grandson were each in turn, Governor of Connecticut. A later descendant, Roger Wolcott, became Governor of Massachusetts. Frances Folsom (now Mrs. Thomas J. Preston, Jr.), who married President Cleveland, was also a descendant of Henry Wolcott.
2. Simon Wolcott, son of (1), born between Sept. 11, 1624, and Sept. 11, 1625; died Sept. 11, 1687; married 2nd, Martha Pitkin, born 1639; died Oct. 13, 1719.
3. Henry Wolcott, son of (2), born May 20, 1670; died Nov. 1746; married 1st Apr. 1, 1696, Jane Allyn, born July 22, 1670; died Apr. 11, 1702.
4. Thomas Wolcott, son of (3), born Apr. 1, 1702; married 2nd, Fannie Dubelory. They resided at Toghanic, N. Y."


Elizabeth Saunders

DWS: from A genealogical record composed of branches of the Wolcott, Hull, Wheeler, Barden, Bryan, Hart and Jones families in America St. Paul, Minn.: 1918 by Claude B Hart


Gov John Webster

DWS: This is the ancestor (gr gr grandfather) of Noah Webster - of Webster's Dictionary fame written in a genealogy by Noah Webster himself in 1836.
DWS: Webster Genealogy. Compiled and printed for presentation only by Noah Webster New Haven: 1836. With notes and corrections by his great-grandson, Paul Leicester Ford.
Brooklyn, N. Y. Privately printed. 1876. Historical Printing Club
"The following account has been compiled by N. Webster.
Family of John Webster.
John Webster, the progenitor of a large family of that name in Connecticut, was from Warwickshire in England. He was one of the original settlers in Hartford, and one of the founders of the republic of Connecticut. From the formation of the constitution in 1639, to the year 1659, he was chosen to office, and as a magistrate or judge, he assisted in administering the government, from 1639 to 1655, when he was elected deputy governor, and 1656 governor. In the three following years he was chosen first magistrate.
In consequence of a long controversy in the church, of which Mr. Stone was pastor, (for an account of which, see Trumbull's History of Connecticut, Vol. I Chap. 13,) John Webster and his sons, with a number of their friends, determined to purchase a large tract of land in Massachusetts, and remove with their families. The agreement for this purpose was dated at Hartford, April 18th, 1659, and signed by fifty nine persons, belonging to Hartford and Wethersfield, including one or two from Windsor. The tract of land which they purchased included the present towns of Hadley, Amherst, South Hadley, and Granby, on the east side of the river Connecticut, and Hatfield and a part of Williamsburg, on the west side. John Webster's name stands at the head of the list of subscribers ; the agreement is also signed by Robert his son. This agreement is recorded on the records of Hadley.
In the same year, 1659, the signers or some part of them, entered upon the work of preparing for settlement in Hadley. John Webster went probably to assist or superintend the laying out of the roads, and other business, but he lodged in Northampton. There he was taken sick, and made his will, which is dated June 25, 1659. This will is recorded on the probate records of Hampshire county, and a copy of it now lies before the writer. It is witnessed by John Russel, Jun. (minister of Hadley,) and Eleazar Mather, (minister of Northampton. )
Mr. Webster recovered from that sickness, and was appointed one of the judges of the court, or as he is called, a commissioner. The judges of the court were John Webster, John Pynchon and Samuel Chapin. The court was held alternately at Northampton, and at Springfield. On the 26th of March, 1661, a court was held at Northampton, and Mr. Webster was present, and he with others took the freeman's oath, before Mr. Pynchon, and Mr. Holyoke, who was recorder. But Mr. Webster died on the 5th of April, and undoubtedly was buried in Hadley, according to a direction in his will.*
John Webster's consort was named Agnes ; and as her husband by will gave her the use of his house and lands in Hartford during her life, it is probable that she remained in Hartford after his death and died there. The house of John Webster stood on the east side of the highway, running north and south on the east side of the hill on which stood the house of the late George Wyllys, and his house was nearly east of the Wyllys house.
It appears by John Webster's will and by other documents, that he had four sons, Robert, Matthew, William and Thomas, and three daughters. Matthew is first named in the will, but Robert was probably the eldest son, as he was named sole executor, and received the largest portion of the estate.
Matthew settled at Farmington. His name is not among those of the eighty four original proprietors, who formed a company for settling in Farmington in 1645. But by the records it appears he was there in 1650, and from that year to 1671; when, being unable to support himself, William Judd and John Woodruff undertook to provide for him and his son John, during their lives. In compensation, Matthew Webster conveyed to them two parcels of land. It is not known when he died. ++
There was a Thomas Webster also, who owned land in Farmington in 1650; but whether he was the son of John hereafter mentioned, is not certain ; if not, nothing further of him is known.
* Noah Webster, when he resided in Amherst, erected a monument to his ancestor in Hadley burying ground.
++ Extracts from the records of Farmington, communicated by Samuel Richards and Horace Cowles, Esquires."
"WEBSTER GENEALOGY . pg 3
John Webster, by his will, gave his lands in Hadley to his sons William and Thomas. William married Mary Reeves in 1671. He resided in Hadley, and died there about the year 1687 or '88, and probably without children. His wife, Mary Reeves, was accused of witchcraft about the year 1684-5 and her testimony was taken and sent to Boston. She however died in peace in 1696.
Thomas Webster, the son of John, removed to Northampton, where in 1663, he married Abigail Alexander, and by whom he had three children, Abigail, George and John. He sold his lands in Northampton, and purchased lands in Northfield, and removed to that town about the year 1673. In 1675, Northfield was attacked by Indians and the settlement broken up, and from 1676 to 1682, Thomas Webster resided in Hadley, where he had three daughters born. He afterwards returned to Northfield, where he died in 1686. Northfield was again destroyed by the Indians, and the settlers driven from the place ; but the children of Thomas probably remained in that neighborhood, for I have known one person of that name, Ezekiel Webster of Northfield, who was in the house of representatives of Massachusetts with me in 1814, and I knew another in Bernardston.
One of John Webster's daughters, Anne, married John Marsh of Hadley, and died June 9th, 1662. Another married William Markham of Hadley, who afterwards returned to Connecticut. A third daughter, Mary; married one Hunt, but she died before the year 1659. She left two children, Jonathan Hunt, the ancestor of the Hunts in Northampton. and Mary Hunt, who married John Ingersoll of Westfield, from whom have descended the Ingersolls in Connecticut.*
Robert Webster was probably the eldest son of John. He was chosen to represent the town of Middletown in 1656, 1657, 1658, and 1659. He was sole executor of the will of his father, and probably did not remove his family to Hadley, or if he did, he returned to Hartford very soon. He died in 1676, and a copy of his will dated May 20th, in that year, (taken from the records in Hartford,) witnessed by Thomas Stedman and Phineas Wilson, is now before the writer. He gave all his estate to his consort Susannah ^'Treat' during her widowhood. She remained a widow till her death. Her will is dated January 23d. 1698. In this she bequeathed her estate to her five sons named, and to the
*Letter from Sylvester Judd, Esq. of Northampton.
**********
DWS: A catalogue of the names of the first Puritan settlers of the colony of Connecticut :
Hartford: Printed by E. Gleason, 1846 by Royal Ralph Hinman: pg 91-93
"Webster, Gov. John. This gentleman probably came into Connecticut in 1637, or in the autumn of 1636. His first appearance as an officer of the Court was in April, 1637. He was then one of the Committee, who for the first time sat with the Court of Magistrates for the purpose of declaring war against the Pequot Indians. He was again the same year elected to the General Court, and was also elected as one of the committe (deputy) in 1638. He was elected a member of the Court of Magistrates at the first General Court holden by Gov. Haynes, in April, 1639. From this time forward for many years he was a member of the General Court as a magistrate or assistant. ... He was uniformly a magistrate or assistant while he remained in the colony after 1638. He was appointed with Mr. Ludlow and Gov. Welles to consult with their friends in the New Haven Colony, respecting the Indian murders which had been committed, to learn of them whether they would approve of a declaration of war as a reparation of the injury, in 1640 ; he was appointed with the Hon. William Phelps, to form a law against lying, and to hold a consultation with the elders upon the subject. He was of the committee with Wm. Phelps, &c., who formed the noted criminal code of laws for the colony, reported and approved by the General Court in 1642-several of which laws yet remain in our statute book with little alteration, except in punishment. In 1655 Mr. Webster was elected Deputy Governor of the colony, and the following year was made Governor. In 1654 he was appointed with Maj. Gen. Mason a member of the Congress of the United Colonies.... He was the first in this country who gave the high character for talent to the name of Webster, which has been since so nobly and amply sustained by Noah as a man of literature, and Daniel as a statesman and orator. Many of his descendants yet reside in Connecticut and Massachusetts. Gov. Webster was from Warwickshire, in England, and was an original settler in Hartford as early as 1637, when he was a member of the General Court. He greatly aided and improved the new form of government in the colony. The severe quarrels in the churches at Hartford and Wethersfield so disgusted, not only Gov. Webster, but 59 others of the settlers in the colony, that upon the 18th day of April, 1659, they signed an agreement, in which they engaged to remove themselves and families out of the jurisdiction of Connecticut, into Massachusetts. Gov. Webster headed the list of names. About three-fourths cf the Signers did remove to Massachusetts, and purchased and settled the town of Hadley, which then included what is now Hadley, South Hadley, Granby and Amherst, east of Connecticut river, and Hatfield and a part of Williamsburg west of the river. Gov. Webster became a Judge of the Court in Hampshire. He died in 1661, and left four sons, Robert, Matthew, William and Thomas. He also left three daughters. Matthew settled in Farmington. William in Hadley, Thomas moved to Northampton, afterwards to Northfield, and was driven from the latter place br the Indians, he then located at Hadley, but finally returned and died at Northfield. His daughter Ann married John Marsh, of Hadley ; the other two married Markham and Hunt. Robert, the eldest son, appears to have remained in Hartford, where he died in 1676. Robert left six sons and four daughters. The daughters were connected by marriage with the families of Seymours, Mygatts and Graves, some of the most respectable settlers. Robert was the branch of Gov. Webster's family through whom Hon. Noah Webster, LL. D., late deceased, traced his ancestry.-(See Robert Webster.)"
****************
Descendants of John Webster, I (Governor) Submitted by Dorothy Ann Schneider
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~rbrown/families/webster.html:
"Generation No. 1
1. JOHN9 WEBSTER, I (GOVERNOR) (MATHEW8, JOHN7, JOHN6, JOHN5, WILLIAM4, JOHN3, WEBSTER OF2 LOCKINGTON, WEBSTER OF1 SCOTLAND) was born August 16, 1590 in Cossington, Leistershire County, England1, and died April 05, 1661 in Hadley, Hampshire County, MA. He married AGNES SMITH November 07, 1609 in Leistershire County, England, daughter of Richard Smith and Agnes Wraske.
Children of John Webster and Agnes Smith are:
i. ELIZABETH10 WEBSTER, m. WILLIAM MARKHAM, 1658, Connecticut.
ii. MATTHEW WEBSTER, b. Bef 1616; d. July 16, 1675, Probably Hadley, Massachusetts.
iii. WILLIAM WEBSTER, b. Abt 1617, England; d. Abt 1688; m. MARY REEVE, 1671.
iv. ROBERT WEBSTER, 2ND LT., b. Abt November 17, 1619, Cossington, Leicester, England; d. May 31, 1676, Hartford, Connecticut.
v. MARY WEBSTER, b. Abt 1620, Essex, England; d. Bef 1659, England.
vi. ANNE WEBSTER, b. July 29, 1621, Cossington, Leicestershire, England; d. June 09, 1662, Northampton, Connecticut.
vii. THOMAS WEBSTER, b. Abt 1643, Windsor, Connecticut?; d. Abt October 1686, Northfield, Connecticut."