Selected Schueth_Rice_Families and Individuals

Notes


Richard D. Rice

at the age of 16 years, was apprenticed to the printing
business at Thomston, ME; where, and at Exeter, NH and also at
Boston, he was in that employment. After working several years
at his trade, he pursued a course of classical studies at the
Academy in China, ME, under the tuition of the Honorable John
B. Pitkin, late of Virginia; and, soon after, became joint
proprietor and editor of the "MAINE FREE PRESS," at Hallowell,
ME, which he published several years. Having been graduated at
the 'Printing Office,' and received his diploma from a
Mechanics Association, he removed to Augusta, and read law with
the Honorable James W. Bradbury, US Senator from Maine. Upon
being admitted t the bar, in 1840, he entered into
copartnership with that gentleman in the practice of law. From
1844 to 1848, he was editor of the "AGE," the leading
Democratic newspaper in Maine. In 1848, he was appointed Judge
of the District Court for the Middle District, -- and in 1852,
a Judge of the Superiour Judicial Court of the State. On a
division of that court, in 1854, he was appointed on of the
"Law and Equity" Judges of the Superior Judicial Court, which
office he now occupies [c. 1855], and resides at Augusta


Richard D. Rice

at the age of 16 years, was apprenticed to the printing
business at Thomston, ME; where, and at Exeter, NH and also at
Boston, he was in that employment. After working several years
at his trade, he pursued a course of classical studies at the
Academy in China, ME, under the tuition of the Honorable John
B. Pitkin, late of Virginia; and, soon after, became joint
proprietor and editor of the "MAINE FREE PRESS," at Hallowell,
ME, which he published several years. Having been graduated at
the 'Printing Office,' and received his diploma from a
Mechanics Association, he removed to Augusta, and read law with
the Honorable James W. Bradbury, US Senator from Maine. Upon
being admitted t the bar, in 1840, he entered into
copartnership with that gentleman in the practice of law. From
1844 to 1848, he was editor of the "AGE," the leading
Democratic newspaper in Maine. In 1848, he was appointed Judge
of the District Court for the Middle District, -- and in 1852,
a Judge of the Superiour Judicial Court of the State. On a
division of that court, in 1854, he was appointed on of the
"Law and Equity" Judges of the Superior Judicial Court, which
office he now occupies [c. 1855], and resides at Augusta